Alchemical Thoughts

Posts Tagged ‘writing

Prompt for Day 26: Show us your Tarot journal if you have one.

I’ve kept writing and journaling for my practice since I started in 2016. I’ve filled up a few notebooks by now. I mainly record my daily draws. Now and then I do spreads which I record, and I jot down spreads to try out later. I also jot down other commonplace notes.

I use nice but inexpensive notebooks and journal books. Usually when some place that sells stationery has a sale or puts some notebooks on clearance, I go stock up.

Below are some photos of my Tarot journals.

Current Tarot journal_01142020 small

This is the journal I am currently using for my Tarot and cartomancy journaling.

 

Tarot journal blessing text_01142020 small

This is the blessing I write by hand into every notebook I use as Tarot journal.

 

Sample Tarot journal page with spread_01142020 small

This is a sample Tarot journal page. This is for last year’s (2019) Samhain spread that I did. Though I did the spread on October 31, I did not get around to writing it up in the journal until November 1. When I can, for spreads I did not create I try to jot down source if I can find it.

 

 

Selection of Tarot journal notebooks filled_01142020 small

Selection of previous Tarot journals. I can say I was using the Steampunk themed notebook around time I was using the Steampunk Tarot (Moore and Fell). I like variety in my journals as much as possible.

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You can find the original prompts by Ethony Dawn here.

I saw this little writing prompt over at Based on a True Story, and I figured it would be easy enough and fun enough to try out. The questions are the ones provided. The answers are mine.

 

1. What are your top three book pet hates?

  • Dreck that looks good but ends up making me mad and wasting my time.
  • Fans of overrated books and authors that just won’t shut up about them.
  • Paperbacks that are poorly made and fall apart after one reading.

2. Describe your perfect reading spot.

In bed. In a rocking chair is also nice.

3. Tell us three book confessions.

  • I do not give a shit about the following: Harry Potter, Game of Thrones (or much of R.R. Martin’s work), True Blood, Dan Brown, James Patterson, and a few other over-hyped writers and works. Do not try to convince me. As I said, I do not give a shit. You be happy over there in your part of the world. I am happy over here just fine. (Notice I did not say I have not read any of these. Some I  have. I just do not give a shit.) Oh, and I also do not give a shit who knows it.
  • I was an English major (B.A. and M.A.), and there are a good number of “classics” I  have not actually read. No, I do not feel bad about it. That’s what Cliff’s Notes and Masterplots are for. How do you think a lot of grad students get through comprehensive exams? It ain’t by always reading the whole thing.
  • As a kid, I never went to a public library. My parents just never took us to one. We did have books at  home, and my mother  encouraged reading. It feels a bit weird because I am a librarian now, and librarians usually have that one story of how some public librarian touched them (not that way, you pervs) and gave them inspiration to eventually become librarians. I found my inspiring librarian when I was in graduate school.

4. When was the last time you cried at a book?

I have never cried when I read a book. I have gotten pissed off at quite a few though.

5. How many books are on your bedside table?

Well, let me think a moment. As of this post, there are five, which are:

  • Agatha Christie, Masterpieces of Murder (a collection of some of her novels).
  • Mario Puzo, The Godfather (started re-reading this as I got an urge to just read something for comfort).
  • Rose Caraway, ed., For the Men and the Women who Love Them (erotica anthology that I have been a bit slow in reading. Hard Times do  not help your mood in reading erotica, but I will get it read. I do feel bad I have not read it already, but as I said, Hard Times do not help).
  • A book on cocktails that has been on the TBR status for a while but I have not managed to get to it yet. (You can tell it has been there a while since I cannot recall the title now without looking.)
  • The Mammoth Book of Dracula, a short stories about Dracula anthology.

Plus I have a bunch of stuff on my iPad (on the Bluefire Reader and on the Kindle for iPad).

6. What is your favorite snack whist you’re reading?

I usually do not snack while I read, but when I do it can be crackers and cheese. I do enjoy my cup of coffee when reading now and then too.

7. Name three books you’d recommend to everyone.

This depends on what day you are asking. At this moment I would recommend the following (links to my reviews):

8. Show us a picture of your favorite shelf on your bookcase.

Work book shelf

Not a favorite, but it makes for a good photo. This is a corner of my book shelf in my office at work. Some of the books were books I read as part of the Dean’s Faculty Reading Group (a campus sort of book club). Others are work related. The jar says “Tips Support Counterintelligence.” And yes, tips are accepted 😉

 

9. Write how much books mean to you in 3 words.

Books are life.

10. What’s your biggest reading secret?

You mean besides the confessions above? What the  heck else do you want from me? Well, it is not much  of a secret now, but I am learning how to read Tarot and oracle cards.

 

I saw this bookish writing prompt at Kaizen Journaling a bit of a while back. I had to think about this one for a little bit. I have read so many books over time, and tastes have changed somewhat over time. A challenge for me is that I did not track what I read when I was a kid, so I had to rely on memory to try to remember what I was reading  way back when that I enjoyed enough to remember. Another challenge for more recent years is that I like a lot of different books, so picking favorites is not easy for me. This post will not have a photo since I wrote out my reply here on the spot rather than doing it in my personal journal. As you will when you compare to the original prompt, I adjusted the categories slightly to adjust for my age. So, for the sake of the prompt, here are some choices as of this post. If you ask me next week, or next month, the choices could be very different:

  • Childhood: The Encyclopedia Brown series. If we go a bit further back, I also enjoyed the tales of Frog and Toad.
  • Teens. I think this was the time I first read One Hundred Years of Solitude (in Spanish by the way). This book is my number one all time favorite,  and it will likely remain so for the rest of my life. It is one I reread every few years.
  • Early 20s: I would have been in college as an undergrad. The Robotech series was one I enjoyed to escape the doldrums of college required reading. I still have the set of novels, and I am hoping to reread them soon.
  • Early 30s: Batman: the Long Halloween is one that emerged from those days. I have a tradition now that I reread it every October, near or on Halloween.
  • Today (as of this post): I would say a few volumes in the Warhammer 40,000 series that feature characters I have come to like and admire: Blood Ravens: the Dawn of War omnibus featuring Space Marines Captain Gabriel Angelos, the Ciaphas Cain series, and the Ultramarines novels featuring Space Marines Captain Uriel Ventris. These days, life is pretty much shit. Not my life per se as I am surviving OK, but current events, the world, society, the stupidest election  ever in the United States, shitty media, all that and more make you want just want to get away from it all and as far away as possible. The 41st Millennium seems quite a good distance to leave it all behind.

I saw this prompt over at Based on a True Story, and I decided to try it out. Picking out five books was not easy for me, and though I picked out five for this post, if you ask me again a few months or years from now, the choices might change.

  • Cien años de soledad (title in English: One Hundred Years of Solitude).  You can find various editions in WorldCat in Spanish and other languages. This is the Argos Vergara Libros DB edition that I have that my mother passed on to me telling me that I had to read it, and so I did. This novel is my all time favorite book, and it is one I tell everyone they need to read if they wish to understand a bit of the Latin American experience, especially as it relates to the United States. But the novel itself is so much more. My copy is now tattered, falling apart, and while I could replace it with a nicer edition, say the Real Academia’s academic edition, well, it was my mother’s copy, and it is one of the very few things I have of hers, and in time I may pass it on to my daughter.
  • James Alan Gardner’s novel Expendable. From the book description, “On any given planetdown mission, there’s always someone whose job it is to walk into danger and get killed. What must it be like to be him, knowing your lifespan is as short as a fruitfly’s?” The main character, Festina Ramos, an expendable member of the Explorer Corps is quite admirable and tenacious, which inspires me. In many ways, I feel like a member of an explorer corps. Plus, unlike certain so-called “rock star” librarians, I have no illusions about being expendable.
  • El Alquimista (title in English: The Alchemist). You can also find various editions of this in English and other languages in WorldCat. Paulo Coelho is Brazilian and writes in Portuguese. Personally, I prefer to read his works in Spanish translation, as that feels much closer to his original language than English. I first read this book when I was about to embark on a new adventure. I had just finished library school, on the basis of a little faith (faith in my myself and the faith of others who believed I could do it), and I was seeking my first professional librarian position. Much like the boy in the story, I was in search of my dream, and I had faith the world would come together to make it happen. I have been a librarian for over a decade now, and it has been a great joy to be a librarian.
  • Las Venas Abiertas de América Latina (English title: The Open Veins of Latin America). You can find various editions in WorldCat. One of the few books I read in college early on that was actually worth a damn. For me, one I would recommend people to who wish to understand the Latin American experience, thus help understand me a bit as well since I was shaped by a big part of that experience. In college, for me, reading and discussing this in a class on Hispanic Culture, Language, and Identity was truly eye opening, and I wish I could tell that teacher thank you for the experience, an experience that shapes me even today.
    • Tied with Galeano’s book is a recent reading, War Against All Puerto Ricans (link to my review). This is a must read to understand the Puerto Rican experience, especially as it relates to the exploitative colonial relation it has to the United States. This is the history my parents and their parents lived, and that I still lived and was influenced by.
  • The Ciaphas Cain novels (Warhammer 40,000. The first three have been collected in an omnibus edition, which I own). From the book’s description, “In the 41st Millennium, Commissar Ciaphas Cain is looking for an easy life, but fate has a habit of throwing him into the deadliest situations and luck always manages to pull him through.” I have a bit of Ciaphas Cain, looking for the easy life, but that is not always an option. Sometimes fate just has other plans for you, and you have to move onward and make things work out. Now, Cain is no coward. He is actually a very skilled fighter and swordsman; he just prefers the easy life. I’d rather have things easy at times, but hey, I’ve got to work for a living.
    • Tied with the Ciaphas Cain novels are the novels of Captain Uriel Ventris and the Ultramarines (Warhammer 40,000. The first six novels of the series are collected in an omnibus and a second omnibus, which I own). Captain Ventris of the 6th Company, like his Ultramarines brothers in arms, lives by the rules. Of the Emperor’s Space Marines, the Ultramarines take the idea of “by the book” to the extreme. So when Ventris bends the rules and succeeds in battle, what do his brethren do? Why they send him to exile to some hell hole to “redeem” himself in their eyes. Because apparently he did not kick enough ass and do it by the rules. Ventris is a guy with integrity who is also practical, honorable, and perseverant, which is why I like him so.

 

Update note: I wrote this post back in 2007, and it ended up in the “private” section of the blog. I think the series of posts I have labeled as private got imported from someplace else (can’t quite remember where, which tells you how long ago that happened). Since they are private, I do not always remember they are there, so I recently went back to look over the cue. Some will likely remain private, as they have topics not necessarily for public consumption. But others like this can be public. It is a good reminder for bloggers and writers to keep on reading. So, via the old Wayback Machine, here is this bit from May 8, 2007.

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Karen Andrews, guest blogging at Problogger, has a post reminding bloggers to read. Yes, it is perfectly ok to unplug from the online world once in a while to actually read a book or a magazine. I know I try to do that now and then. In fact, as a reader, I face the conflict of having too much stuff to read and not enough time to read it in. Maybe I should take that advice and stay away from the feed reader a bit more often. Besides, if nothing else, reading can always provide you with something to talk about in social settings, but that is a different story. Ms. Andrews writes:

” Get off the chair and turn off the computer. It will be there in the morning. Pick up a magazine. Go to bed early with a novel you’ve had on your ‘must read’ list for a while. ‘De-plugging’ is a good option for those of us on the point of burnout. Standing back from your own words may give you a better perspective than if you are crouched over a desk.”

Maybe I should try the one about going to bed early with the book I have been meaning to read. I was not sure about this idea Ms. Andrews wrote:

” The skill of critically evaluating a text is commonly taught today. It is not enough to simply say you like (or don’t like) something anymore. You need to back up your claims and once properly done so you can debate a subject at a greater depth than you otherwise would have.”

I agree with the idea of being able to back up what you say. What struck me was the idea that such a skill was commonly taught. I am not sure I agree with it given my teaching experience. I am of the theory that standardized testing is ruining a generation. One way to the ruin is that students are not taught about critical reading or critical thinking as much these days. After all, the tests are mostly multiple choice, so not much critical thinking going on there. I had to learn how to argue and back up my points when I was in school, and it is a skill that serves me well today. It is also something I strive to teach my students. Reading broadly and diversely can help people learn how to think and evaluate texts critically. Anyhow, a good reminder of why reading is so important, especially for bloggers.


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