Alchemical Thoughts

Posts Tagged ‘sex and erotica

CuriousGeorgeReading

I keep adding books to my ever growing TBR book lists.

Items about books I want to read:

  • A new book is out on the history of cigarettes and corporate imperialism. The book is Cigarettes, Inc., and it is highlighted at TruthOut.
  • Via Vox, this book “not exactly a guide to doing nothing; more like a suggestion that you could refuse to do some of the things that fracture your attention — reading every push notification that crosses your phone screen, watching 500 Instagram stories between every basic task — and protect your mind from becoming slippery and splintered.” This is certainly a concern in our time, and yes, we really need to work on refusing to do certain things just because they are expected or something beeps at you. The book is How to do Nothing: Resisting the Attention Economy.
  • A look at American cook books, you know, those books companies make with recipes using their products. The book is American Advertising Cookbooks, and I heard about it via Boing Boing.
  • Apparently not all suburbs were not all nice and quiet and conformist. A few apparently had a share of anarchists and other radicals. You can learn more about this in the book Radical Suburbs. Via CityLab Daily.
  • The New Republic discusses the history of cults in the United States and highlights the book American Messiahs, a book “tracing a series of cults and communes through history from the founding of the American Republic to the fall of Jonestown.”
  • In what I would consider odds and ends, the US Army has a book length report on how to do regime change and interventions. Story via Telesur. You can find the PDF document here.
  • This is one of those books that if I really want to read I may have to buy. Sure, WorldCat has a record but only a British library has it. I am doubtful my library is willing to ILL that for me here in the middle of nowhere Kentucky. The book is Marquis de Sade– 100 Erotic Illustrations, and it was featured in VICE. Amazon may have it though challenge may be finding the English edition (originally in German it seems). Hmm, buying from the publisher, even from abroad, may be an option.
  • My Reader’s Block finds a Poirot book she has not read, the short story collection Poirot Investigates. I have not read the book either as of this post, so adding it to my TBR list.
  • Stupid Fish Productions announces that The Sexy Librarian’s Dirty 30, Volume 3 (link to publisher site) is coming (should be out by the time this post is published).
  • This Latino Rebels article about recent history of Puerto Rico, worth a look, highlights a new to me book of photography: The Puerto Rican Diaspora (also additional link to author website).
  • VICE has an excerpt of the memoir Modern Whore. (Also, author’s website. If you want to buy, you likely need to go to the site and order from a store that has it. Amazon not only does not list it, but in their hypocritical search they change a search of “modern whore” to some “clean phrase”).
  • Given the issues of trade wars the United States is flaring up around the world in places like Mexico, this book may be of interest. The book is Eating NAFTA, and it was highlighted at the Food Politics blog. This book may also be good to read along side Fresh Fruit, Broken Bodies (link to my review).
  • Speaking of food and food policy, Food Politics blog also highlights the book Grand Food Bargain. The blogger describes the book as “A former USDA insider’s account of what our Grand Food Bargain—a system focused on ever-increasing production of cheap food—actually costs Americans in poor health, environmental degradation, and loss of agrarian values and community.”

 

“Quarantined” books (books that fall under my self-imposed moratorium on politics, activism, etc.). A new category in this series. I am currently under a moratorium on reading anything political, activist, social justice, and such, and I am hoping that moratorium will end some day. . .maybe. . . once the Hard Times end. In the meantime, these are books I would usually read, but I am not in order to keep the sanity, but I am still listing them because I hope a day will come I will feel I can read them again.

 

Lists and bibliographies:

 

 

 

 

CatReading

Photo from Flickr user Raider of Gin (fairerdingo). Image used under terms of Creative Commons 2.0 Generic Attribution License.

 

I missed doing this feature for a while, so I am working to bring it back.

This is the list of books I reviewed at The Itinerant Librarian for the month of April 2019. Feel free to check them out. Links go to the reviews.

 

CuriousGeorgeReading

Welcome to the first post in this series for 2019. I continue jotting down books that sound interesting, and that I hope to read some day.

Items about books I want to read:

 

“Quarantined” books (books that fall under my self-imposed moratorium on politics, activism, etc.). A new category in this series. I am currently under a moratorium on reading anything political, activist, social justice, and such, and I am hoping that moratorium will end some day. . .maybe. . . once the Hard Times end. In the meantime, these are books I would usually read, but I am not in order to keep the sanity, but I am still listing them because I hope a day will come I will feel I can read them again.

 

Lists and bibliographies:

 

 

Welcome to another installment in my series of books I want to read. It’s been a while (since June or so of this year) since I have posted here, and I am glad to get something written and posted. In this post, I have added a new feature, “quarantined” books. This is basically books I would like to read, but due to my self-imposed moratorium on political/activist/social issues books I am not getting to them any time soon. I figure that people who do not need to mind their sanity as much as I do in these Hard Times may be interested in such books. I have been working on this particular post in and out for a good while now. Life has kept me busy, so I have been adding to it as I can, and today I can finally share it. Happy reading.

 

 

Items about books I want to read:

 

“Quarantined” books (books that fall under my self-imposed moratorium on politics, activism, etc.). A new category in this series. I am currently under a moratorium on reading anything political, activist, social justice, and such, and I am hoping that moratorium will end some day. . .maybe. . . once the Hard Times end. In the meantime, these are books I would usually read, but I am not in order to keep the sanity, but I am still listing them because I hope a day will come I will feel I can read them again.

  • A  look at why the middle class in the U.S. is not doing well. The book is Squeezed: Why Our Families Can’t Afford America. It was discussed over at AlterNet.
  • The U.S. has been griping about Russian meddling in U.S. elections and such. However, the U.S. has no ground to stand on morally because it has its own very extensive history of election meddling in other nations. This is discussed over in The Atlantic, including highlights of the book Covert Regime Change (link to publisher. As of this post, the book was not published yet).
  • New book looking at the continuing water crisis in Flint, Michigan. The book is The Poisoned City, and it was reviewed at The Christian Science Monitor.
  • Thomas Frank has a book out on what Democrats and liberals in general keep getting wrong about “Main Street USA.” The book is Rendezvous with Oblivion, and he discusses it in an interview at Truthout.
  • Private prisons are a big business in the United States, and they are not in the business of treating prisoners well. NPR takes a look at the book American Prison, where an investigative reporter went undercover and worked as a corrections officer in one of those private prisons to expose what really goes on inside.

 

Lists and bibliographies:

 

 

In 2018, I made a self-imposed moratorium on reading any book related to politics, social issues, social justice, activism, or other similar topics. After reading White Trash, which I did for our campus Dean’s Faculty Reading Group, I mostly got burned out. So I am pretty much reading a lot of light and escapist stuff. However, I do anticipate a day when I may go back to reading such books, so I am including some of those on my list. Yet it may be a good while before I read those kinds of books again. I pretty much embarked on the #AllOutOfFucksToGiveTour, and I am pretty happy about it. Meanwhile, let’s see what books I am adding to my ever growing TBR list this time. As always, book title links go to WorldCat unless otherwise noted.

 

Items about books I want to read:

 

Lists and bibliographies:

 

 

 

This is the lucky 7’s edition of this blog series. Let’s have a look at what I am adding to the ever growing TBR list this time. As usual, all book title links lead to WorldCat so you can find a copy in a library near you (unless otherwise noted).

Items about books I want to read:

  • One of the reasons I like early October is because it  is Nobel Prizes season. One of the prizes announced was the one in economics. This year, it went to an economist who works in behavioral economics. I do not usually read economics texts, but this kind of work sounds interesting, so I am adding his book Nudge to my reading list.
  • Marion Nestle mentions providing a blurb for the book Big Chicken.
  • Since reading Smoke Gets In Your Eyes, a book I highly recommend by the way(link to my review), I have become more interested in learning about death rituals and the death/mortuary industry. Here is another addition for reading in those topics. The book is Confessions of a Funeral Director. The book’s author was interviewed in VICE.
  • Another one via VICE. The book in question discusses the freelance and wandering worker economy. Imagine a world where workers just wander from one big warehouse, like Amazon’s fulfillment warehouses, to another to make ends meet. For many, that dystopia is already a reality. The book is Nomadland.
  • I have to admit that though I like and enjoy science fiction, I have not read as much of it recently as I would like. There is always  something else calling my attention, or perhaps a nonfiction book that feels more urgent than something escapist. Still, I want to work on having a better reading balance. Here is a book that bills itself as a “definitive anthology of space opera and military sf.” That is a tall order, so I am curious. The book is Infinite Stars, and it was reviewed at Bookgasm.
  • There is a new manga rebooting Captain Harlock. Of course I have to add it to my reading list. The book is Captain Harlock, Space Pirate: Dimensional Voyage, Volume 1. It was reviewed at A Case for Suitable Treatment.
  • For something different, Dangerous Minds looks a bit at the work of Bruce of Los Angeles with the male figure and mentions the book The Naked Heartland.
  • Via Patheos, a look at “Paula Deen and Charlottesville.” The article mentions and features an excerpt from the book Trouble I’ve Seen.
  • A librarian has a new book out about J.C. Penney, the guy who founded the company and had a bit of a role in shaping rural United States. The book is J.C. Penney: The Man, the Store, and American Agriculture, and I heard about it from the University of Wyoming’s site.
  • Something for my horror reading, a review of Paul F. Olson’s short fiction collection Whispered Echoes. Review via Horror Novel Reviews.
  • The poor, “oppressed,” left behind poor rural white guy Pendejo In Chief voter has pretty much become a cliche. Break out the little violins for those assholes. Books like Hillbilly Elegy came out to try to “explain” those people to the  rest of us with  little success (let’s be honest, that author basically is a guy of privilege who clearly forgot where he came from to put it mildly). So by now, when I see yet another book on Appalachia and the poor, I groan. Still, here is the latest offering that claims to be “not just another account of Appalachia’s current plight, but a journey deeper in time to help us understand how the region came to be the way it is.” I will believe it when I see it and read it. I am adding it to the list not so much because I want to read it; I may or may not, but because it does have a local interest to me. Odds are good my college library will order a copy of it. The book is Ramp Hollow: The Ordeal of Appalachia, and it was discussed in ProPublica.
  • A new book connects the old Ku Klux Klan with the rise of bigoted hate that seems so rampant today. If you read your history, you would not be surprised. At any rate, if you want to learn more, maybe consider reading The Second Coming of the KKK. Reviewed at The Texas Observer.
  • A little something in critical theory and information sciences. Library Juice blog announces a new book: The Feminist Reference Desk.

 

 

Lists and bibliographies:

CuriousGeorgeReading

I have reached 70 of these lists. Never ceases to amaze me how many interesting books I keep finding that I want to read someday, and if any of my readers find a reading idea in these posts, that is cool too. As some of you may know, I recently started studying Tarot, so that explains why you may find a book or two on Tarot on these lists once in a while. So, let’s see what has made the list this week.

Items about books  I want to read:

  • While I am not sure I would personally get a tattoo (I have speculated on what I  would get if I ever decide to do it), I have mentioned previously that I do find tattoo art fascinating, especially when it  is well done. So naturally, a book on tattoo art can be of interest to me. Via Boing Boing, I found Mitch O’Connell’s new book  of his tattoo art: Mitch O’Connell Tattoos Volume 2.
  • Also via Boing Boing, a chance to look back at a bit of my childhood with  a  book on toys from the 50s, 60s, and 70s. The book is Toys of the ‘50s, ’60s and ’70s.
  • Coloring books are a craze these days with adults, and there  is one for just about any topic under the sun.  For instance, there is a Sex Toy Coloring Book (link to publisher, warning cover is  slightly NSFW). The book was reviewed at Bea’s Book Nook. Sounds like something you and your special someone can share in fun.
  • In Llewellyn’s blog, Barbara Moore writes a bit about the book Psychic Tarot and how to integrate  some of its  advice. The book sounds intriguing to me as I continue my learning journey in Tarot and oracle cards.
  • Also at the Llewellyn blog, Moore also speaks on how some Tarot books specific to one deck can still have information you can use with  other decks. While at it, she mentions the book The Ultimate Guide to Thoth Tarot. Down the road, I would like to learn and study the Thoth Tarot deck.
  • My interest in Tarot and oracle cards continues. At the moment, I just read the cards for myself mainly as a meditation tool. So a book on how to read better for yourself is something I would be interested in. The Tarot Lady interviews Courtney Weber, author of Tarot for One.
  • Meanwhile, Tarot with Jeff has been doing a bit of Tarot history reading with the book A Wicked Pack of Cards.
  • Marion Nestle at Food Politics highlights the book Ten Restaurants that Changed America.
  • Via The Information Literacy Weblog, link to the free information literacy e-book Got a Minute? This is billed as a collection  of essays for busy instruction librarians. It’s the kind of quick refresher I can always use.
  • Dark Horse has a 30th anniversary edition of their Aliens comics. The book is Aliens 30th Anniversary: The Original Comic Series, and it was reviewed at Wink Books.
  • Apparently, Salvador Dali at one point put a cookbook together. Being Dali, it is a surrealist cookbook. Turns out that Taschen is reprinting the book, and I would love to take a look at it. The book is Les Diners de Gala, and I heard about it at the Fine Books & Collections blog.
  • With the election of Donald Trump, some wonder if the signs were there. I can say that yes, they were. If people had paid attention and heeded the lessons of the past, and actually gave a damn about their fellow human beings, the Con Man of Mar-a-Lago would not be headed to the White House; some people have labeled him as Caudillo of Mar-a-Lago, but that is an insult to what caudillo actually means (I am Latino, believe me, I know a thing or two about real caudillos). But let me move past digression. Some folks have  been looking around to see if works anywhere predicted the election. Here is one that could be convincing in that regard. The New York Times highlights the book Achieving Our Country by Richard Rorty. They highlighted three paragraphs from the book that are now all over the Internet, reviving interest in the 1998 book. I am not usually one to pick up books that go viral, but the passages have made me curious enough to be interested because they pretty much reflect other things I have read that confirm what the book’s author wrote. Hat tip to 3 Quarks Daily. The signs were definitely there.
  • I have mentioned before that I find old books interesting. Here is  How to Speak with the Dead from 1918, which you can read for free online thanks to archive.org. Tip via Daily Tarot.
  • And speaking of the dead, here is a book of essays and photos of the dearly departed. The book is Memento Mori, and it was reviewed at Wink Books.
  • Staying a bit more with the odd and curious, here is a book of botanical images that looks interesting. The book is Cabinet of Natural Curiosities, and it was reviewed at Wink Books.
  • Wink Books also recommends B.P.R.D. 1946-1948. I already like Hellboy and the B.P.R.D., so I do not need too much arm twisting to pick that one up.
  • Again, here is another of those illustrated books that show how things work that I just love to look over. The book is Food Anatomy, and it was highlighted at Wink Books.
  • This one may help me get a bit of LGBTQIA reading in, and it is a graphic novel too. The book is Queer: a Graphic History, and it was presented at Lambda Literary.
  • Based on a True Story reviews a new book about marijuana and cannabis. The book is Brave New Weed.
  • Wink Books reviews a cook book by Alton Brown that seems to channel his Good Eats show days (before he went downhill). The book is Alton Brown: EveryDayCook.

 

Lists and bibliographies:

  • Horror Novel Reviews offers a list  of “10 Horror Novels That Deserve a Big Screen Adaptation.” For me, this is also a list of possible reading suggestions.
  • Recent reviews and responses to the book Hillbilly Elegy have been mixed to say the least. If you want to read other things instead of that book or to supplement if you already read it, here is a list of other books you may be interested in. Via The Booklist Reader.
  • I always wish I had to the time to improve on my handwriting ( do write in a pretty good cursive, but there is always room to improve) and even learn calligraphy. In the meantime, I can read a bit about it, so here is a list of books that can help you learn hand lettering and calligraphy. Via BookRiot.

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