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CatReading

Photo from Flickr user Raider of Gin (fairerdingo). Image used under terms of Creative Commons 2.0 Generic Attribution License.

I neglected to do this last month, so we are getting a double feature this month. As always, links go to the full reviews at The Itinerant Librarian in case you missed them or are curious what I have been reading and reviewing.

Books reviewed in September 2019:

Book reviewed in October 2019. Looking back, this month’s feature was books about books and reading:

I also watched the following media:

CuriousGeorgeReading

I keep adding books to my ever growing TBR book lists.

Items about books I want to read:

  • A new book is out on the history of cigarettes and corporate imperialism. The book is Cigarettes, Inc., and it is highlighted at TruthOut.
  • Via Vox, this book “not exactly a guide to doing nothing; more like a suggestion that you could refuse to do some of the things that fracture your attention — reading every push notification that crosses your phone screen, watching 500 Instagram stories between every basic task — and protect your mind from becoming slippery and splintered.” This is certainly a concern in our time, and yes, we really need to work on refusing to do certain things just because they are expected or something beeps at you. The book is How to do Nothing: Resisting the Attention Economy.
  • A look at American cook books, you know, those books companies make with recipes using their products. The book is American Advertising Cookbooks, and I heard about it via Boing Boing.
  • Apparently not all suburbs were not all nice and quiet and conformist. A few apparently had a share of anarchists and other radicals. You can learn more about this in the book Radical Suburbs. Via CityLab Daily.
  • The New Republic discusses the history of cults in the United States and highlights the book American Messiahs, a book “tracing a series of cults and communes through history from the founding of the American Republic to the fall of Jonestown.”
  • In what I would consider odds and ends, the US Army has a book length report on how to do regime change and interventions. Story via Telesur. You can find the PDF document here.
  • This is one of those books that if I really want to read I may have to buy. Sure, WorldCat has a record but only a British library has it. I am doubtful my library is willing to ILL that for me here in the middle of nowhere Kentucky. The book is Marquis de Sade– 100 Erotic Illustrations, and it was featured in VICE. Amazon may have it though challenge may be finding the English edition (originally in German it seems). Hmm, buying from the publisher, even from abroad, may be an option.
  • My Reader’s Block finds a Poirot book she has not read, the short story collection Poirot Investigates. I have not read the book either as of this post, so adding it to my TBR list.
  • Stupid Fish Productions announces that The Sexy Librarian’s Dirty 30, Volume 3 (link to publisher site) is coming (should be out by the time this post is published).
  • This Latino Rebels article about recent history of Puerto Rico, worth a look, highlights a new to me book of photography: The Puerto Rican Diaspora (also additional link to author website).
  • VICE has an excerpt of the memoir Modern Whore. (Also, author’s website. If you want to buy, you likely need to go to the site and order from a store that has it. Amazon not only does not list it, but in their hypocritical search they change a search of “modern whore” to some “clean phrase”).
  • Given the issues of trade wars the United States is flaring up around the world in places like Mexico, this book may be of interest. The book is Eating NAFTA, and it was highlighted at the Food Politics blog. This book may also be good to read along side Fresh Fruit, Broken Bodies (link to my review).
  • Speaking of food and food policy, Food Politics blog also highlights the book Grand Food Bargain. The blogger describes the book as “A former USDA insider’s account of what our Grand Food Bargain—a system focused on ever-increasing production of cheap food—actually costs Americans in poor health, environmental degradation, and loss of agrarian values and community.”

 

“Quarantined” books (books that fall under my self-imposed moratorium on politics, activism, etc.). A new category in this series. I am currently under a moratorium on reading anything political, activist, social justice, and such, and I am hoping that moratorium will end some day. . .maybe. . . once the Hard Times end. In the meantime, these are books I would usually read, but I am not in order to keep the sanity, but I am still listing them because I hope a day will come I will feel I can read them again.

 

Lists and bibliographies:

 

 

 

 

CatReading

Photo from Flickr user Raider of Gin (fairerdingo). Image used under terms of Creative Commons 2.0 Generic Attribution License.

 

I missed doing this feature for a while, so I am working to bring it back.

This is the list of books I reviewed at The Itinerant Librarian for the month of April 2019. Feel free to check them out. Links go to the reviews.

 

Here we go again with the latest additions to my ever growing TBR list. As always, book title links to go to WorldCat, so you can borrow it from a library near you unless otherwise noted.

Items about books I want to read:

  • A Thanksgiving article, one of those about chefs giving advice for the holiday. I picked up on this for mention of the chef’s book Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat. Story via Vox.
  • Here is another foodie book, this one about six Americans in Paris including Julia Child. The  book is The Gourmands’ Way, and it was reviewed in The New York Times.
  • There is a new (to me at least) history of hoaxes that may be relevant in these Hard Times of fake news. The book is Bunk, and it was reviewed in The New York Times.
  • Do you ever wonder what kind of food you could bring to a funeral? Or for any  other occasion? Well, Elizabeth Heiskell’s cookbook What Can I Bring? may provide some answers. Story via The Lexington Herald Leader.
  • Here is an early bit of humor on travel narratives with  A Journey Round My Room by Xavier de Maistre. The book is freely available online at Public Domain Review. If you prefer print, some libraries do have it.
  • Benebell Wen reviews a new (to me at least) Tarot basics book. The book is Going Beyond the Little White Book. Book is self-published, so no WorldCat record as of this post. Wen’s review includes purchase options.
  • A lot of (ignorant) people love to say the U.S. is a Christian nation (spoiler: it is not. Go ahead, read the “Founding Fathers” sometime, secular as they were). Histories of Christianity in the U.S. are plentiful, but there are not many about atheism and secularism in the U.S. This book attempts to remedy that. The book is Village Atheists: How America’s Unbelievers Made Their Way in a Godly Nation. It was discussed at Los Angeles Review of Books.
  • Though the review is a bit mixed, the book still looks interesting, and I may take a look. The book is Mangasia, and it was reviewed at The Manga Critic.
  • Schlock Value reviews one of those old books that you are not quite sure if they are so bad they are good kind of thing. Still, could be interesting to read. The book is Moon Zero Two.
  • This is a totally cute idea. Someone made a book about cats who do pest control at distilleries. The book is Distillery Cats, and it was reviewed at The New York Times. I’ve got to read this one sooner rather than later.
  • Here is another one for cat lovers: If I Fits, I Sits. It’s a book of cat pictures and quotations. Reviewed at City Book Review.
  • I do not care much for sports, but I have read a book or two on some sports-related topic if it was interesting. This one sounds very interesting, so I am adding it to my TBR list. The book is The Pride of Havana: a History of Cuban Baseball. It was reviewed at Shelf Talk.
  • Here is a book about how old books can be turned into works of  art. The book is entitled The Book, and it was featured in City Book Review.
  • This may either be a work of genius or the work of someone who had way too much time on their hands. This author has looked at the Pendejo In Chief’s words and found poetry. Amazing, huh? The book is The Beautiful Poetry of Donald Trump. It was featured in Dangerous Minds.
  • A book on rum? Sure. The book is Rum Curious, and it was highlighted at Drinkhacker.
  • Learn about the real cost of those chicken nuggets in places like McDonald’s in The Hamlet Fire. Marion Nestle highlighted it in her Food Politics blog.
  • Let’s look at some horror. Via Horror Novel Reviews, here is The Devil and My Daughter (no WorldCat record available as of this time),  a book with the plot starting with “a young film crew who shoot an extreme indie horror film.”
  • I not only like to read, but I also like books and the culture around them, so a book like Footnotes from the World’s Greatest Bookstores is the kind of book I would be interested in. Granted, it has a foreword by Garrison Keillor (who turns out to not only be insufferable but turns out he is also an asshole), but I think I can live with that to get the rest of the book. The book was reviewed at Wink Books.

 

Lists and bibliographies:

 

Photo from Flickr user Raider of Gin (fairerdingo). Image used under terms of Creative Commons 2.0 Generic Attribution License.

This is the list of books I reviewed for the month of October 2017 over at The Itinerant Librarian. Links lead to the reviews. Feel free to check them out.

 

Welcome to another post in this series about books I want to read. The list keeps getting bigger, but I do not mind. I think I got some interesting selections this time around. As always, if you read one of these books, feel free, if you feel moved to do so, to come back and leave a comment letting me know what you thought of the book.

 

Items about books I want to read:

  • Let’s start by taking a trip down memory lane. If you grew up with or remember those Little Golden Books, you can reminisce with Golden Legacy: the Story of Golden Books. Note this is a new 2017 edition; apparently, there was a previous edition back in 2007, at least according to WorldCat. Story via The Christian Science Monitor.
  • According to the article, the author of this book argues that impoverished whites are passing down their hopelessness to future generations. Sounds quite depressing. The book is Happiness for All? by Carol Graham. Story via The Rural Blog.
  • On the other hand, a lot of Americans, and I mean a lot, have an obsession with wealth and money. This is not really new, but what is interesting about this book is that a photographer went out to document it. The book is Generation Wealth, and the story comes from The Atlantic.
  • In recent news, the author of the book Nixonland responds to the idea of comparing the Pendejo In Chief to President Nixon. He says there is no real comparison, after all, Nixon “. . .was just so shrewd, so strategic: It’s simply inconceivable he would get caught with his pants down implicating himself on the record, like Trump now does almost daily. . . “.  I could not care less about the Pendejo In Chief, but I am adding Nixonland to my reading list.  Story via The Week.
  • Here is a cute little book for young and future activists. The book is A is for Activist. It was featured in the Poor as Folk blog.
  • A gruesome horror title that, according to the reviewer you may want to skip if “explicit sex, graphic gore, and profanity are not your thing. . .” That works for me. The book is Body Art, and it is one you have to get via Amazon it seems (not currently in WorldCat. I wonder why).  Review from Horror Novel Reviews.
  • Via The Los Angeles Review  of Books, a review of the new feminist manifesto by Jessa Crispin: Why I Am Not a Feminist. I have some mixed feelings on this one. I have read Crispin’s work before, however, what I read was very different than this. In addition, I have seen some pretty negative reviews of it, and while I try not to get prejudices from reviews, I still wonder. My public library has it, so I may pick it up sooner rather than later. If I read it, I will likely write a review on the blog, but I will make sure not to tag her on social media or contact her in any way when  I publish it. It seems in her book she cares little about men, and she does not care what we think of her book. Cited in the review, Crispin states, “I just want to be clear that I don’t give a fuck about your response to this book. [Point taken!] Do not email me, do not get in touch. Deal with your own shit for once.” Okay.
  • Wonder how Jesus became a revered figure and prophet in Islam? Did you even know that is a fact? Well, you may consider reading The Islamic Jesus by Mustafa Akyol. I have known this, in part because I have read The Qu’ran, but I can always learn more. Story via The New York Times.
  • The new (to me at least) manga Murciélago looks interesting. Murder, comedy, and sex? Hey, I am there. Via The OASG.
  • Jack Womack looks at the culture of UFO believers and trackers plus shows off some of his ephemera on the topic in his book Flying Saucers are Real. Story via Wink Books.
  • Via the Tumblr blog Swingin’ (user: kahuna68), an image of the 1962 cover of The Manchurian Candidate. Given the ascendancy of the Pendejo In Chief, it may be time to read this book.
  • Via @TABItarot, a review of the book 365 Tarot Spells. It is a collection of Tarot spreads, which may come in handy for me as I continue to learn and study Tarot.
  • Jane Meyer, author of Dark Money, discusses her work and the concept of dark money in politics at Esquire.
  • At the Food Politics blog, we get a look at Fast Food Kids. The book is described as “an academic sociologist’s account of what and how kids eat in school, and why.”
  • To show you can find a book on just about any topic, including topics dear to perhaps older librarians, here is a book on library card catalogs highlighted at Hyperallergic. It was not that long ago we had card catalogs. In fact, in my first library job as a student worker many moons ago, the library I was working at was in the process of converting from a card catalog to what would become their computerized catalog. Anyhow, the book is The Card Catalog.
  • The Lowrider Librarian has announced that the book he co-edited is out: Librarians With Spines. The book is a result of a crowdfunding effort. It is an anthology of queer and minority voices in librarianship, the kind of book we need more in our profession. If I manage to get a copy, I will post a review. I wonder how it might compare with Where Are All the Librarians of Color?, which I read a while back (link to my review of that).

 

Lists and bibliographies:

 

 

CuriousGeorgeReading

Time sure flies. So many books, so little time as they say. We have made it to 72 of these lists of books I want to read someday. This post feels a bit more important as I included a few book lists to help out folks who may need comfort or understanding during the Hard Times we are facing. As always, if you read any of these, feel free to comment and let me know what you thought of a book.

Items about books I want to read:

  • Via NPR, a book about the decline of one American factory town. The town is Lancaster, Ohio, and the book is Glass House.
  • When I was an undergrad, one of the courses I had to take for  history teaching minor was in ancient history. One of the books I had to read for that class was the Lives of Plutarch. The edition was not particularly memorable; I think it was the Penguin edition. However, there is a new translation out entitled The Age of Caesar that covers five of Plutarch’s Roman lives. The translation is done by Pamela Mensch. I think  I may give Plutarch another chance. Story via The Christian Science Monitor.
  • I like free books, and books that help me in my work, even better. Via the Information Literacy Weblog I discovered the Handbook for Information Literacy Teaching (link to the book resource).
  • Not a free book, unless I managed to get it via Interlibrary Loan maybe, but still it could help with my work. There is a new book on librarians and serving diverse populations out. The book is Information Services to Diverse Populations: Developing Culturally Competent Library Professionals by Nicole Cooke, and here is the announcement of the book’s release from her employer.
  • Library Juice Press announces they have a new book on social justice and the LIS classroom. This may be more for LIS college professors than practitioners in the field, but it may be worth a look. The book is Teaching for Social Justice: Implementing Social Justice in the LIS Classroom.
  • Here is a book about libraries, specifically Carnegie Libraries. The book is Free to All: Carnegie Libraries & American Culture, 1890-1920, and it was briefly mentioned at LIS News.
  • I always like books about bar culture, its lore and history, even though I am not much into bars personally (I like the concept, just not the execution and culture these days). This new book is “a sort of compilation of a dozen or more ‘Old Books, with a particular focus on two Waldorf-centric books from the 1930s. In nearly 400 pages, Caiafa takes you through an alphabetical exploration of the classics, providing their recipes, variations, backstories, and in-depth context for every cocktail’s creation.” Features old books? That is just a bonus for me. The book is The Waldorf Astoria Bar Book, and it was reviewed at Drinkhacker.
  • Via 20th Century Man, a  suggestion to read Dean R. Koontz’s Demon Seed novel. I am thinking maybe having a feature on the main book blog where I go back and review older, classics and other not so well remembered books. Stay tuned.
  • Claire Conner, author of Wrapped in the Flag, which is “narrative history of the infamous ultra-conservative John Birch Society, written by one of its founder’s daughters” (from the book’s description), recently had a post in Crooks and Liars entitled “The Radical Right Runs America, But Democrats Still Don’t Get It.” In the post, she highlights the book and discusses how the Democrats and the Left in the U.S. basically do not get it despite all the warnings, signs, evidence, so on. I can certainly point  to a  few books  I have read already in addition to Ms. Conner’s that explain just fine what is going on and how we got to having the Pendejo in Chief in the White House. The bottom line is the warnings and signs were all there to be seen, but many chose not to see while the bigots, misogynists, ultra conservatives dug in and then blew things up. I have not read Conner’s book yet, but I am adding it to my list and hope to get to it soon.
  • I have not added any new, or at least new to me, mangas in a while, so here is Goblin Slayer, Volume 1. It was reviewed at A Case for Suitable Treatment.

 

Lists and bibliographies:

  • With the election  of the Pendejo in Chief as President of the United States and the ascendancy of his party, there are major concerns when it comes to women’s health and rights. One of those concerns is the Roe v. Wade decision that every other “pro-lifer” wants to abolish because women dying in back alleys is a small price to pay to keep those uppity women in place. If you want to learn more about how it was before that judicial decision, here is a list of books on “What Life Was Like Before Roe v. Wade in 7 Books.” Go read a book or two and get a clue as needed. Story via Signature.
  • Also via Signature, another list to help during the Hard Times where lies (oops, alternative facts) seem to be the order of the day. So, to help inoculate you from the bullshit, here is “Myth Busting Books: 13 Antidotes to ‘Alternative Facts‘”.
  • One more from Signature to help with the Hard Times. There has been  a lot about Russia in the news recently, so to help out here is “Spy vs. Spy: 13 Books on the Shadowy Past of Russia-US Relations.
  • Another type of book that some folks may  want to read during the Hard Times ahead are the Latin American novels of the dictator. Book Riot has a list of four of these for your consideration. And yes, there are others we could add to the list. I have read two from the list.
  • Book Riot also has a list of “100 Must-Read Graphic Memoirs.” I do not think every single title is a must-read, but there are some gems in the pile if you have the patience to look.
  • The Information Literacy Weblog has a small list of some free books on social media research overseas with links to the resources.

 


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