Alchemical Thoughts

Posts Tagged ‘hispanic/latino

This is the lucky 7’s edition of this blog series. Let’s have a look at what I am adding to the ever growing TBR list this time. As usual, all book title links lead to WorldCat so you can find a copy in a library near you (unless otherwise noted).

Items about books I want to read:

  • One of the reasons I like early October is because it  is Nobel Prizes season. One of the prizes announced was the one in economics. This year, it went to an economist who works in behavioral economics. I do not usually read economics texts, but this kind of work sounds interesting, so I am adding his book Nudge to my reading list.
  • Marion Nestle mentions providing a blurb for the book Big Chicken.
  • Since reading Smoke Gets In Your Eyes, a book I highly recommend by the way(link to my review), I have become more interested in learning about death rituals and the death/mortuary industry. Here is another addition for reading in those topics. The book is Confessions of a Funeral Director. The book’s author was interviewed in VICE.
  • Another one via VICE. The book in question discusses the freelance and wandering worker economy. Imagine a world where workers just wander from one big warehouse, like Amazon’s fulfillment warehouses, to another to make ends meet. For many, that dystopia is already a reality. The book is Nomadland.
  • I have to admit that though I like and enjoy science fiction, I have not read as much of it recently as I would like. There is always  something else calling my attention, or perhaps a nonfiction book that feels more urgent than something escapist. Still, I want to work on having a better reading balance. Here is a book that bills itself as a “definitive anthology of space opera and military sf.” That is a tall order, so I am curious. The book is Infinite Stars, and it was reviewed at Bookgasm.
  • There is a new manga rebooting Captain Harlock. Of course I have to add it to my reading list. The book is Captain Harlock, Space Pirate: Dimensional Voyage, Volume 1. It was reviewed at A Case for Suitable Treatment.
  • For something different, Dangerous Minds looks a bit at the work of Bruce of Los Angeles with the male figure and mentions the book The Naked Heartland.
  • Via Patheos, a look at “Paula Deen and Charlottesville.” The article mentions and features an excerpt from the book Trouble I’ve Seen.
  • A librarian has a new book out about J.C. Penney, the guy who founded the company and had a bit of a role in shaping rural United States. The book is J.C. Penney: The Man, the Store, and American Agriculture, and I heard about it from the University of Wyoming’s site.
  • Something for my horror reading, a review of Paul F. Olson’s short fiction collection Whispered Echoes. Review via Horror Novel Reviews.
  • The poor, “oppressed,” left behind poor rural white guy Pendejo In Chief voter has pretty much become a cliche. Break out the little violins for those assholes. Books like Hillbilly Elegy came out to try to “explain” those people to the  rest of us with  little success (let’s be honest, that author basically is a guy of privilege who clearly forgot where he came from to put it mildly). So by now, when I see yet another book on Appalachia and the poor, I groan. Still, here is the latest offering that claims to be “not just another account of Appalachia’s current plight, but a journey deeper in time to help us understand how the region came to be the way it is.” I will believe it when I see it and read it. I am adding it to the list not so much because I want to read it; I may or may not, but because it does have a local interest to me. Odds are good my college library will order a copy of it. The book is Ramp Hollow: The Ordeal of Appalachia, and it was discussed in ProPublica.
  • A new book connects the old Ku Klux Klan with the rise of bigoted hate that seems so rampant today. If you read your history, you would not be surprised. At any rate, if you want to learn more, maybe consider reading The Second Coming of the KKK. Reviewed at The Texas Observer.
  • A little something in critical theory and information sciences. Library Juice blog announces a new book: The Feminist Reference Desk.

 

 

Lists and bibliographies:

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Photo from Flickr user Raider of Gin (fairerdingo). Image used under terms of Creative Commons 2.0 Generic Attribution License.

 

This is the list of books I reviewed at The Itinerant Librarian for September 2017. If you missed any, or you find any of interest, feel free to check them out. Comments are always  welcome.

 

Made it to 76 of these to be read lists. Let’s see what we are adding this time.

 

Items about books I want to read:

  • This book may answer a question I am sure many people in the U.S. have: why the heck do government prosecutors not prosecute rich executives and CEOs when they commit financial crimes, etc. The book is The Chickenshit Club. The book was reviewed at The New York Times.
  • In a case of what is old is new again, Hannah Arendt’s 1951 book The Origins of Totalitarianism is popular again. Story via Vox.
  • Once more, I wonder where are these thrift stores where people find cool stuff like vintage horror novels. Anyhow, if I can find it, I may consider reading The Beast Within. It was reviewed at Horror Novel Reviews.
  • The story of the book saviors/smugglers of Timbuktu, which was seen in The Bad-Ass Librarians of Timbuktu, is getting yet another book treatment with The Book Smugglers of Timbuktu. The latter book was reviewed at The Guardian. I am always a little leery when I see books on the same topic come out real close in publication to each other. A few librarians I know have mentioned the first book, so I am bit more likely to pick that one. We’ll see.
  • A new book argues that Hitler exploited an interest in his audience in the supernatural and the occult. The book is Hitler’s Monsters, and the author was interviewed in VICE.
  • In the U.S., you can go pretty much to any  good grocery  store and find any fruit or vegetable any time of the year no matter the season. That may be a big issue, and it is explored in the book Never Out of Season. The book was reviewed in The New York Times.
  • You know things are bad in the United States  when some parents wonder how they can talk to their kids about the Pendejo In Chief. Well, for those few folks with values and concerns, there is a new book that deals with  how to talk to children about Trump. The book is How Do I Explain This to my Kids? Parenting in the Age of Trump. Book was mentioned at BillMoyers.com.
  • Here is a memoir of a very unlikely true story: a young “campaign manager” to get his friend to be Playgirl’s Man of the Year back in the seventies. Story via Boing Boing. The book is Man of the Year by Lou Cove.
  • I have liked Arturo Pérez Reverte after I read El Club Dumas. I probably should reread it sometime so I can write a proper review. Anyhow, another of his novels recently got a mention and review at Sounds and Colours. The book is La Reina del Sur. On a side note, I might be able to get to that book sooner as I recently found a copy in our local public library’s Friends of the Library sale.
  • This next book I am adding out of curiosity, though I am not sure if I will feel up to reading it or not given its topic of dysfunctions of academia. I already see things this book may cover on a semi-regular basis. so I do not feel a need to read about them, but as I said, I am curious. If nothing else, the book gives me hope that perhaps some day I ought to write the book I have  in mind about academic libraries and their dysfunctions. Yes, I have a tale or two I could tell in fictional form. Anyhow, the book in question now is Dealing with Dysfunction: a Book for University Leaders. It was reviewed at Inside Higher Ed.
  • Apparently higher education workplace toxicity is possibly an emerging trend in books as here is another one also featured at Inside Higher Ed. The book is The Toxic University. Again, I am adding it not so much because I am sure to read it but mostly out of curiosity.
  • Based on a True Story reviews the book Al Franken: Giant of the Senate. I am not keen on yet another politician’s book, but Franken may well be the only decent US Senator serving today. Heck, I’d consider moving to Minnesota just so I could vote for him and keep him in office. The review states that Franken reads the audiobook himself, so I may consider reading it in audio form too.
  • An American tries to understand how the United States relates to the rest of the world in Notes on a Foreign Country. It was reviewed in The Christian Science Monitor.
  • Interested in LGBT movie poster history? Then The Queer Movie Poster Book may be for you. It was mentioned in this article on The Advocate.
  • The Texas Observer recently had an article on the devotion of Santa Muerte. Aside from the article being interesting to read, it mentions some books I may want to read or at least look over down the road.
  • Via The Spectator, review of a book on Arabic script and calligraphy. The book is By the Pen and What They Write.
  • For librarians, and those who just like libraries, yes, there is a book on card catalogs, and The Washington Post reviewed it. The book is The Card Catalog.
  • Via The Texas Observer, the author of Los Zetas Inc., discusses why Mexico’s drug war is not about drugs.
  • Here is a little more shop reading for the librarian. Library Juice Press is announcing a new book: Topographies of Whiteness: Mapping Whiteness in Library and Information Science. It sounds like a relevant book for these Hard Times.
  • Finally for this post, a little children’s book that I think adults who like comics will enjoy as well. The book is Bedtime for Batman, and it was presented at Wink Books.

 

Lists and bibliographies:

 

Here is the list of books I reviewed over at The Itinerant Librarian for June 2017. Feel free to check them out. Book links go to the reviews unless noted otherwise.

Photo from Flickr user Raider of Gin (fairerdingo). Image used under terms of Creative Commons 2.0 Generic Attribution License.

 

 

CuriousGeorgeReading

A new year is here, and we have a new list of books I would like to read some day. So many  books, and  so little time. Still, I do want to remember, which is why I keep these lists.

Items about books I want to read:

  • I happen to like H.P. Lovecraft and his works. I recently got as a  gift a nice edition of his complete fiction, which I hope to be reading soon. In addition, I have gotten more interested in his works and The Necronomicon that is featured in some of his works in light of my Tarot studies. The Tarot angle comes from the fact that there is a Necronomicon Tarot that I would like to acquire down the road. The deck is created by Donald Tyson, who has a trilogy of works in the Necronomicon world, including the deck. So I am interested  in reading as much as I can about the Necronomicon. So this is a long bit of background to mention that Lovecraft did write his own small history of his fictional work, The History of the Necronomicon, in 1927, and I would like to read that too sometime. There is a 1980 reprint some libraries have. You can also read  it online for free (turns out it is a very short thing. However, that site also is a Lovecraft archive, and you can read many if not all of his  works  online for free). The work was mentioned in the Quo Vadis blog.
  • While Obama was president, there was  the possibility  of opening relations with Cuba. With the Orange One, not so sure. Still learning about the island nation is a good thing, and here is a recent book to help with that. The book is To Have Been There, which is “a memoir by Gregory Randall about growing up in “revolutionary” Cuba from the late 1960s to the early ‘80s.” The book is a translation of the original from Spanish. That one was published in 2013, and the title is Estar allí Entonces. As of this post, I could not find libraries with  the English edition (it is new at the  moment), but a few do have the one in Spanish, and that works for me just fine. The book was discussed at The Rumpus.
  • Here we have a look at some of the first world problems of privileged parents of kids in Brooklyn, New York City. It is labeled as a satirical novel. The book is Class, and it is “Lucinda Rosenfeld’s stiletto-sharp new novel about the quandaries and neuroses that consume the lives of a small swath of privileged white public-school parents in Brooklyn…”. I am usually not much into regular literary fiction, but this sounds interesting enough for me to consider it. I heard about the book via The New York Times.
  • Also via The New York Times, a new book by Michael Eric Dyson. I have liked his writing before, but he is one  of those authors that gets me upset at the state of the world. Yet, like Jonathan Kozol and some others, the work is still important. Dyson’s new book is Tears We Cannot Stop.
  • Matt Taibbi also has a  new book out. This one is looking at the 2016 elections in the United States. The book is Insane Clown President, and I saw it at Truthout.
  • Benjamin Walker’s podcast The Theory of Everything highlights the book The Twentieth of January, a 1980s spy thriller ”
    about a KGB plot — uncovered by a British intelligence agent — to get their stooge elected president of the US!” An interesting thing I am noticing lately is people going back to old books such as dystopias, thrillers, and even horror to find how they “predicted” or somehow reflect the Hard Times now. This book certainly does make you wonder. It certainly seems that a good number of fictional scenarios that may have seen horrifying or ridiculous back when are actually becoming reality. Anyhow, if you prefer to read the discussion, there is a transcript for the podcast. I first learned of this via Boing Boing.
  • On a lighter note, The Well-Appointed Desk reviews the book The year of Living Danishly.
  • The Christian Science Monitor features a review of a new biography of Rumi. The book is Rumi’s Secret.
  • Via the Contemporary Japanese Literature blog, a review of a translation of the Japanese horror novel The Graveyard Apartment.
  • trashcompactorzine blog recently posted a photo of the cover of Creepy Presents Richard Corben. It is a collection of Corben’s work for Creepy and Eerie magazines.
  • Mark Lindner of habitually probing generalist reviewed a new graphic novel biography of Johnny Cash (well, new to me). I have enjoyed a few other graphic novel biographies, and this one looks good, so I am glad to be adding it to my list of books to read. The book is Johnny Cash: I See a Darkness.
  • I enjoy alcoholic spirits in moderation, and as I may have mentioned before, I do enjoy reading about them, their history, and how they get made. Living in Kentucky now, I have gotten more interested in learning about bourbon whiskey, so books on the topic are of interest. Drinkhacker offers a review of Bourbon: The Rise, Fall, and Rebirth of an American Whiskey.
  • According to tales that may or not be apocryphal, Aleister Crowley used his occult powers to help the British against Hitler. I am not sure where the truth starts and the myth takes over, but it sounds like a great story. Lo and behold someone made a graphic novel of it. The book is Aleister & Adolf, and this is one I definitely want to read. It was reviewed by Wink Books. In addition, Dangerous Minds has a small interview with the author of the graphic novel.
  • The Los Angeles Review of Books reviews a novel described as barrio noir. Part of the reason it caught my eye is because Santa Muerte is figured prominently in the book, and it is being compared to Neil Gaiman’s work. The book is Zero Saints.
  • Over at Little Red Tarot, Liz Worth gives advice on that to do if a Tarot reading confuses you (as reader) and promotes her book Going Beyond the Little White Book: A Contemporary Guide to Tarot. It is self-published, so you can visit Ms. Worth’s online shop to acquire a copy.

 

 

Lists and  bibliographies:

  • Via The Guardian, a list of dystopias other than Nineteen-Eighty Four that may be of interest in these Hard Times. It is a pretty good list. I would add to it The Repossession Mambo (link to my review), which was basis of the film Repo Men. I have already read two from the list: The Handmaid’s Tale (which I did not care for) and Brave New World.
  • The title of this list says it all: “6 Books That Explain How the GOP Went Crazy.” If you need to understand how we got to the Hard Times, or you were not paying attention, reading some of these books might help. Via New York Magazine.
  • At Based on a True Story, a list of some underrated books they would like you to consider. The blogger, much like me, often reads “a lot of books that other people have never heard of.”
  • The American Library Association’s (ALA) Reference and User Services Association (RUSA) has released their list of notable books for 2017. Some of you may find this of interest. They also have a list of best for 2017 in genre fiction. I am a librarian who feels he is fairly well informed, and I had no idea there is a genre called “adrenaline.” I get the feeling RUSA made that one up.
  • Comic Book Resources (CBR) offers a list of “The 16 Best War Comics.” I think it would be worth the effort tracking many of these old gems down.
  • Signature always makes good lists of books to understand issues. This time we have a list of “6 Books to Better Understand (and Solve) Homelessness in America.” I can certainly see understanding it, but solving it? Americans are notorious for ignoring big problems and for being overall selfish. Sure, a one-time disaster like a hurricane happens, and they pour out donations, but caring in general for their fellow human beings? Heck no. I would not hold my breath waiting for that to happen. Yet I hope.
  • Signature also offers a list helpful for the Hard Times, a list of “7 Books to Understand the Incoming Trump Administration.” Well, it is no longer incoming, but reading some of this may help better understand how the U.S. got here. These are not books about Trump, except for his Trump: the Art of the Deal, but rather books about issues that the new regime will face such as Putin, China, and Syria.

CuriousGeorgeReading

Another week, and another bunch of books I would like to read someday. As the saying goes, so little times, so many books.

Items about books I want to read:

  • I continue adding to my interest to learning more about bourbon with Bourbon: a History of the American Spirit. The book was reviewed in San Francisco Book Review.
  • Given the current political climate in the United States, this book sounds like a necessary read. The book is Taking Liberties: Why Religious Freedom Doesn’t Give You The Right To Tell Other People What To Do. The book was reviewed in San Francisco Book Review.
  • Let’s add in some more history. I often like reading about periods or events in history that may not be widely known. Astoria, about how Thomas Jefferson and John Jacob Astor attempted to create a western trading empire, sounds interesting. It was featured in San Francisco Book Review.
  • As I have written before, I am always interested in books about books and the book trade. So I am adding The Art of the Publisher to the list. It was discussed in The Christian Science Monitor.
  • Here is a little something to help diversify my reading for one. Plus I think some of my feminist friends may be interested in this one as well. The book is My Life on the Road by Gloria Steinem, and it was reviewed in Mother Jones magazine.
  • I remember living through the dissolution of the Soviet Union. The event is often portrayed as this big “American victory,” but as often is the case in history, things are not as simple as that (nor is that vision really true). You can learn more about the reality of what happened in The Last Empire, which was reviewed in San Francisco Book Review.
  • Here is something on higher education in the United States and China. In this article from Inside Higher Ed, “In Palace of Ashes: China and the Decline of American Higher Education (Johns Hopkins University Press), Mark S. Ferrara contrasts the ‘downward trajectory’ of American higher education against the rise of China’s university system.”
  • Via Drinkhacker, a review of a book on tiki drinks, you know, those nice tropical drinks that evoke some island paradise when done well. The book is Tiki Drinks: Tropical Cocktails for the Modern Bar.
  • Here is another one via Drinkhacker, this time on beer. The book is Beer for all Seasons.
  • I do like vintage things, and yes, I do like adult films and entertainment, so naturally I like vintage and older porn and adult entertainment. Thus a book like Graphic Thrills Volume 2 (apparently there is a volume one too) on adult film vintage posters is of interest. You can find the review in The Rialto Report.

 

Lists and bibliographies:

  • An older item, but still of interest: the first translations of a set of Zapatista children’s textbooks is available as a free download. Story via Global Voices.
  • There is a graphic novel adaptation of Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? Catch is Boom Studios! for some reason thought putting it out in 6 volumes instead of one large volume was a good idea.We’ll see if I can find a set. Story via Wink Books.
  • I will admit that I have not watched the Netflix show “Narcos.” To be honest, I could not care less about Netflix, but that is another story. Anyhow, I do have an interest in the topic of narcos in Latin America overall, so this list of books for folks waiting for the next season of the show interested me anyhow. From the list, I have read Gabriel García Márquez’s News of a Kidnapping, which I do recommend.
  • Via the blog RA for all: Horror, here is a list of small presses in the genre, which I am saving to look over later.
  • Here is more on movie posters. Via Wink Books blog, two books on James Bond movie posters.
  • Via The Booklist Reader, a list of books on creativity.

Here is the list of books I reviewed at The Itinerant Librarian for the month of September 2015. As always, comments are welcome. So if you find any of these interesting and/or you read them, feel free to let me know your thoughts. Links go to the book reviews.

 


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