Alchemical Thoughts

Posts Tagged ‘higher_education

Made it to 76 of these to be read lists. Let’s see what we are adding this time.

 

Items about books I want to read:

  • This book may answer a question I am sure many people in the U.S. have: why the heck do government prosecutors not prosecute rich executives and CEOs when they commit financial crimes, etc. The book is The Chickenshit Club. The book was reviewed at The New York Times.
  • In a case of what is old is new again, Hannah Arendt’s 1951 book The Origins of Totalitarianism is popular again. Story via Vox.
  • Once more, I wonder where are these thrift stores where people find cool stuff like vintage horror novels. Anyhow, if I can find it, I may consider reading The Beast Within. It was reviewed at Horror Novel Reviews.
  • The story of the book saviors/smugglers of Timbuktu, which was seen in The Bad-Ass Librarians of Timbuktu, is getting yet another book treatment with The Book Smugglers of Timbuktu. The latter book was reviewed at The Guardian. I am always a little leery when I see books on the same topic come out real close in publication to each other. A few librarians I know have mentioned the first book, so I am bit more likely to pick that one. We’ll see.
  • A new book argues that Hitler exploited an interest in his audience in the supernatural and the occult. The book is Hitler’s Monsters, and the author was interviewed in VICE.
  • In the U.S., you can go pretty much to any  good grocery  store and find any fruit or vegetable any time of the year no matter the season. That may be a big issue, and it is explored in the book Never Out of Season. The book was reviewed in The New York Times.
  • You know things are bad in the United States  when some parents wonder how they can talk to their kids about the Pendejo In Chief. Well, for those few folks with values and concerns, there is a new book that deals with  how to talk to children about Trump. The book is How Do I Explain This to my Kids? Parenting in the Age of Trump. Book was mentioned at BillMoyers.com.
  • Here is a memoir of a very unlikely true story: a young “campaign manager” to get his friend to be Playgirl’s Man of the Year back in the seventies. Story via Boing Boing. The book is Man of the Year by Lou Cove.
  • I have liked Arturo Pérez Reverte after I read El Club Dumas. I probably should reread it sometime so I can write a proper review. Anyhow, another of his novels recently got a mention and review at Sounds and Colours. The book is La Reina del Sur. On a side note, I might be able to get to that book sooner as I recently found a copy in our local public library’s Friends of the Library sale.
  • This next book I am adding out of curiosity, though I am not sure if I will feel up to reading it or not given its topic of dysfunctions of academia. I already see things this book may cover on a semi-regular basis. so I do not feel a need to read about them, but as I said, I am curious. If nothing else, the book gives me hope that perhaps some day I ought to write the book I have  in mind about academic libraries and their dysfunctions. Yes, I have a tale or two I could tell in fictional form. Anyhow, the book in question now is Dealing with Dysfunction: a Book for University Leaders. It was reviewed at Inside Higher Ed.
  • Apparently higher education workplace toxicity is possibly an emerging trend in books as here is another one also featured at Inside Higher Ed. The book is The Toxic University. Again, I am adding it not so much because I am sure to read it but mostly out of curiosity.
  • Based on a True Story reviews the book Al Franken: Giant of the Senate. I am not keen on yet another politician’s book, but Franken may well be the only decent US Senator serving today. Heck, I’d consider moving to Minnesota just so I could vote for him and keep him in office. The review states that Franken reads the audiobook himself, so I may consider reading it in audio form too.
  • An American tries to understand how the United States relates to the rest of the world in Notes on a Foreign Country. It was reviewed in The Christian Science Monitor.
  • Interested in LGBT movie poster history? Then The Queer Movie Poster Book may be for you. It was mentioned in this article on The Advocate.
  • The Texas Observer recently had an article on the devotion of Santa Muerte. Aside from the article being interesting to read, it mentions some books I may want to read or at least look over down the road.
  • Via The Spectator, review of a book on Arabic script and calligraphy. The book is By the Pen and What They Write.
  • For librarians, and those who just like libraries, yes, there is a book on card catalogs, and The Washington Post reviewed it. The book is The Card Catalog.
  • Via The Texas Observer, the author of Los Zetas Inc., discusses why Mexico’s drug war is not about drugs.
  • Here is a little more shop reading for the librarian. Library Juice Press is announcing a new book: Topographies of Whiteness: Mapping Whiteness in Library and Information Science. It sounds like a relevant book for these Hard Times.
  • Finally for this post, a little children’s book that I think adults who like comics will enjoy as well. The book is Bedtime for Batman, and it was presented at Wink Books.

 

Lists and bibliographies:

 

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CuriousGeorgeReading

Welcome to another edition in this series of posts about books I would like to read some day. As always, if you read any of these, feel free to come back and comment to let me know what you thought of a book. Also, if you have ideas and suggestions for books you think I may want to read, let me know as well in the comments. Let’s see what we have for this week.

 

Items about books I want to read:

  • A former chief of police in Seattle, Norm Stamper was recently featured in Democracy Now! discussing police issues in the United States. He has a new book out on the topic, To Protect and to Serve: How to Fix America’s Police. It seems like a timely book that needs for more people to be reading it.
  • Because I find macabre things interesting now and then, I would like to read Beyond the Dark Veil, a collection of Victorian era post-mortem photography. Story about the book via Boing Boing.
  • These days, Jesse Ventura can have his entertaining and even thought provoking moments. However, him explaining why some are voting for Trump is not one of them. Moving along, this piece highlights his new book, which sounds like it could be an entertaining read. The book is S*it Politicians Say. Story about it via Esquire magazine.
  • Next we have a bit of dark humor with 13 Elegant Ways to Commit Suicide. The older book was highlighted at Dangerous Minds.
  • Another book discussing the issues of gun culture and the big business of selling guns in the United States. This time the book is The Gunning of America, and it was reviewed in a full essay in the The Times Literary Supplement.
  • Here is a book about books, or rather in this case about readers. The book is The Reader in the Book, and it was reviewed at Los Angeles Review of Books.
  • Via @TABITarot, a review of The Ultimate Guide to Tarot Spreads. This may be one to consider adding to my collection down the road as a reference source.
  • This is one of those books that I would enjoy browsing through as a child, the kind of book that has a little bit of everything. The book is Mann’s Pictorial Dictionary, and it was featured in Boing Boing.
  • And one more book via Boing Boing. It is a coffee book of what is described as brutalist architecture. The book is This Brutal World.
  • This book could be an interesting proposition. Basically, it can help explain why dumbasses in the poor states, like say the Deep South, take a ton of federal money and aid, and still hate the federal government (and usually vote Republican). The book is American Amnesia. The book was discussed at AlterNet.
  • Bill Moyers’ site has an article looking at class, politics and Trump while highlighting the recent book White Trash, which is a history of class in the U.S.
  • If you like works like Ambrose Bierce’s A Devil’s Dictionary, you may also enjoy Encyclopedia of Hell published by the folks at Feral House. It is sort of an invasion manual for demons to know what they will find when they get to Earth. The book was featured at Boing Boing.
  • I always find stuff on writing and specially handwriting to be of interest, so I am hoping this book will make for good reading. The book is The History and Uncertain Future of Handwriting, and it was reviewed at Inside Higher Ed.
  • I  am adding this one in part because I feel I should at least look at it. Honestly though, I do not give much of a hoot about student evaluations of their college professors, which for the most part can be petty and pretty meaningless when it comes to actual assessment. That is another conversation for another day. In the meantime, there is a new book highlighting such student comments. The book is To My Professor, and it was reviewed at Inside Higher Ed.
  • Only reason I am linking to this post from the Librarian Shipwreck blog is that  it mentions a book on  the concept of planned obsolescence (a.k.a. the  money grabbing move companies make of making shit products so you have to buy them again every few years, like Apple’s current fuckery regarding the iPhone 7 with  no headphone jack) that I think is worth  a look. The book is mentioned all the way at the bottom of the post, and the book is Digital Rubbish.
  • This book just sounded interesting. The book is Season of the Witch: How the Occult Saved Rock and Roll, and it was reviewed at Rock and Roll Tarot blog.
  • Barbara Moore, one of the big gurus in Tarot, discusses the concept of reading Tarot intuitively on the Llewellyn website, and she also links to the book Tarot Fundamentals, which I may be interested  in reading.
  • Another Tarot book that I might be interested in reading down the road is Tarot Mysteries, which was reviewed at Tarot Notes blog.
  • Sean Gaffney highlights the fourth volume of the manga series Black Bullet. Sounds like one to try out, but I would need to start with the first volume.
  • The Lowrider Librarian reviews the  book The Other Slavery. If you think African American slavery was all there was in the United States, you need to read that book. I know I will be getting to it soon.

 

 

Lists and bibligraphies:

CuriousGeorgeReading

 

Welcome to another list of items about books I would like to read some day. So many books, so little time. But I will fight the good fight, and I will read as many as I can.

Items about books I want to read:

 

Lists and bibliographies:

CuriousGeorgeReading

Here is my first post on this series for 2016. My TBR keeps growing, but I also hope these lists help other readers out there find ideas for new books to read.

Items about books I want to read:

 

List and bibliographies:

CuriousGeorgeReading

Another week, and another bunch of books I would like to read someday. As the saying goes, so little times, so many books.

Items about books I want to read:

  • I continue adding to my interest to learning more about bourbon with Bourbon: a History of the American Spirit. The book was reviewed in San Francisco Book Review.
  • Given the current political climate in the United States, this book sounds like a necessary read. The book is Taking Liberties: Why Religious Freedom Doesn’t Give You The Right To Tell Other People What To Do. The book was reviewed in San Francisco Book Review.
  • Let’s add in some more history. I often like reading about periods or events in history that may not be widely known. Astoria, about how Thomas Jefferson and John Jacob Astor attempted to create a western trading empire, sounds interesting. It was featured in San Francisco Book Review.
  • As I have written before, I am always interested in books about books and the book trade. So I am adding The Art of the Publisher to the list. It was discussed in The Christian Science Monitor.
  • Here is a little something to help diversify my reading for one. Plus I think some of my feminist friends may be interested in this one as well. The book is My Life on the Road by Gloria Steinem, and it was reviewed in Mother Jones magazine.
  • I remember living through the dissolution of the Soviet Union. The event is often portrayed as this big “American victory,” but as often is the case in history, things are not as simple as that (nor is that vision really true). You can learn more about the reality of what happened in The Last Empire, which was reviewed in San Francisco Book Review.
  • Here is something on higher education in the United States and China. In this article from Inside Higher Ed, “In Palace of Ashes: China and the Decline of American Higher Education (Johns Hopkins University Press), Mark S. Ferrara contrasts the ‘downward trajectory’ of American higher education against the rise of China’s university system.”
  • Via Drinkhacker, a review of a book on tiki drinks, you know, those nice tropical drinks that evoke some island paradise when done well. The book is Tiki Drinks: Tropical Cocktails for the Modern Bar.
  • Here is another one via Drinkhacker, this time on beer. The book is Beer for all Seasons.
  • I do like vintage things, and yes, I do like adult films and entertainment, so naturally I like vintage and older porn and adult entertainment. Thus a book like Graphic Thrills Volume 2 (apparently there is a volume one too) on adult film vintage posters is of interest. You can find the review in The Rialto Report.

 

Lists and bibliographies:

  • An older item, but still of interest: the first translations of a set of Zapatista children’s textbooks is available as a free download. Story via Global Voices.
  • There is a graphic novel adaptation of Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? Catch is Boom Studios! for some reason thought putting it out in 6 volumes instead of one large volume was a good idea.We’ll see if I can find a set. Story via Wink Books.
  • I will admit that I have not watched the Netflix show “Narcos.” To be honest, I could not care less about Netflix, but that is another story. Anyhow, I do have an interest in the topic of narcos in Latin America overall, so this list of books for folks waiting for the next season of the show interested me anyhow. From the list, I have read Gabriel García Márquez’s News of a Kidnapping, which I do recommend.
  • Via the blog RA for all: Horror, here is a list of small presses in the genre, which I am saving to look over later.
  • Here is more on movie posters. Via Wink Books blog, two books on James Bond movie posters.
  • Via The Booklist Reader, a list of books on creativity.

CuriousGeorgeReading

Another week, and another list of books I would like to read someday. So, let’s see what we got this week.

Items about books I want to read:

  • AlterNet recently featured a profile piece on Ta-Nehisi Coates. It mentions his new book Between the World and Me. Given all the recent racial tensions going on, this may be a timely read. It certainly would go well with a few other relevant books I have been reading recently.
  • Via Liberation News, the book Revolution Manifesto: Understanding Marx and Lenin’s Theory of Revolution (no WorldCat record available as of this post). Some may say Marx and his ideas have no relevance today. I say given today’s climate of inequality and oppression Lenin’s and his ideas on revolution may well be relevant once more. As the news site states, “whether it is brutal murders by the police, the injustices perpetrated every day in the legal and prison system, or the military interventions around the globe—the state remains a topic of utmost importance for today’s revolutionaries. In the everyday struggles of working class and oppressed people the state often presents itself as the main enemy.” That may be a good reason to read this.
  • This I just saw on my news feed, and I knew it was timely and had to add it to my list right away. Via Counter Current News, a review and discussion of the book Rise of the Warrior Cop: the Militarization of America’s Police Forces. This is one I will very likely order for my library as well.
  • The next item is for one of those phrasebooks you can use in a workplace. I have used one or two before, usually to help fill out annual job reviews that require very specific language and usually use Likert scales to measure competency (as if, but that is another conversation for another day). Since then, I have a small interest in this kind of workplace book, which can either be good aids when you are short on words or right out workplace bullshit enablers. Anyhow, here is Powerful Phrases for Dealing With Difficult People. I am sure this is the kind of book you need if yo are doing annual evaluations, and you need to say “Bob is basically a sociopathic uncooperative asshole” in nicer terms. The book was reviewed at San Francisco Book Review.
  • We have two cats in our home, and they help keep life interesting. To that end, learning more about felines is a good thing, and the book Cat Sense may be helpful for that. It was also reviewed at San Francisco Book Review.
  • This is a different book about Alice in Wonderland. The book is a documentation and look at ways the characters of Alice in Wonderland have appeared in comics over time. In other words, how those comics somehow brought in the literary characters. The book is Alice in Comicland, and it was featured at Wink Books.
  • Here is something different, a book about mazes. The book is Labyrinths and Mazes, and it was also featured at Wink Books.
  • Moving to a different track, here is looking at food in terms of it being a commodity. Via the Food Politics blog, a book on the food commodities trading world. The book is Bet the Farm.
  • Also via the Food Politics blog, a book looking at industrial farming and its consequences for the world. The book is The End of Plenty.
  • I always have an interest in higher education books. This looks more like a book for my library, but if I do order it, I may pick it up. I do also have an interest in international affairs. The book is China’s Rising Research Universities, and it was reviewed at Inside Higher Ed.
  • Also discussed at Inside Higher Ed, a book that “makes the case for all colleges — not just those religiously affiliated ones that were part of the Lilly experiment — to talk to their students about living meaningful lives.” The book is The Purposeful Graduate.
  • As I am always looking for new manga to read, preferably with some kind of dark twist, this seems to fit the bill. The book is Alice in Murderland, Volume 1, which was reviewed at A Case for Suitable Treatment.
  • Let’s toss a little smut in for fun; yea, I do read some low end fun stuff once in a while. I got Becoming a Thug Wife (Amazon link. Check the pricing as it may have changed) when it was a freebie on Amazon, and I have been reading it in bits and pieces; it’s written as a set of short episodes. When I do get it done, I will likely review it. Anyhow, I saw that Bending the Bookshelf posted a review of it, so jotting down here as a reminder for me to finish it. I can tell  you the book does have its entertaining moments.
  • And now, let’s go for a little armchair travel with Cool Japan Guide: Fun in the Land of Manga, Lucky Cats, and Ramen. It was reviewed at Contemporary Japanese Literature.
  • A couple of books on drinking and spirits via Drinkhacker. One of the things I enjoy doing is visiting wineries and distilleries. I do find the process of making alcoholic spirits to be quite interesting, and often you get taste the product. First, let’s learn about the science with Proof: the Science of Booze (reviewed here). Second, the book Whisk(e)y Distilled (review over here).

 

Lists and bibliographies:

When I was doing outreach for my previous library, one of my duties was editing the library’s newsletter. I believe that newsletter stopped being published after I left, in spite of having been around long before I had arrived there, but the administration sort of had been hinting it wanted to let it go. A pity, as I think it not only served as a publicity and marketing tool, but also served for documentation. Anyhow, not my problem anymore. Back then, I had pulled aside these articles to read up more on the topic of newsletters to help me improve ours and learn more. Eventually I moved on to my current position, and this post lingered in my drafts folder for quite a while. These days, my library has a blog I created for them, and it is a tool we are working on developing further; it also serves a bit as our newsletter. Writing about that may be a post for another day. In the meantime, here is the stuff to look over.

Some notes:


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