Alchemical Thoughts

Posts Tagged ‘food and epicurious

Photo from Flickr user Raider of Gin (fairerdingo). Image used under terms of Creative Commons 2.0 Generic Attribution License.

For the moment, I am caught up with these posts. With the reading challenges set in January, I was able to get back to book reviewing in February. There is a bit of everything this month, so I hope my three readers find something of interest. As always, comments are welcome.

 

  • I read about the history of paper with Paper: Paging Through History. However, this book was a a bit underwhelming to be honest. I think I will hold out for the other book on the topic by Nicholas Basbanes.
  • I learned a few lessons about life from wiseguys in The Way of the Wiseguy. This book is by the author of Donnie Brasco.
  • I also took a trip to 1851 to read about The Thousand Dollar Dinner. Before things like Iron Chef and Top Chef and all those other crappy competition shows that followed, this was the celebrity chef cook off of the day.
  • In graphic novels, I read Bushido: the Soul of the Samurai, which is an adaptation of a classic work on Bushido.
  • Here is a little classic humor with  Zits: Sketchbook 1.
  • If you hate, or love to hate, those fake “history” or pseudoscience documentaries on certain cable networks (you know the ones), you might appreciate the horror of Rolling in the Deep.
  • And I ended the month  with  a bit more of classic humor via The MAD Bathroom Companion: the Gushing Fourth Edition.

 

CuriousGeorgeReading

Time sure flies. So many books, so little time as they say. We have made it to 72 of these lists of books I want to read someday. This post feels a bit more important as I included a few book lists to help out folks who may need comfort or understanding during the Hard Times we are facing. As always, if you read any of these, feel free to comment and let me know what you thought of a book.

Items about books I want to read:

  • Via NPR, a book about the decline of one American factory town. The town is Lancaster, Ohio, and the book is Glass House.
  • When I was an undergrad, one of the courses I had to take for  history teaching minor was in ancient history. One of the books I had to read for that class was the Lives of Plutarch. The edition was not particularly memorable; I think it was the Penguin edition. However, there is a new translation out entitled The Age of Caesar that covers five of Plutarch’s Roman lives. The translation is done by Pamela Mensch. I think  I may give Plutarch another chance. Story via The Christian Science Monitor.
  • I like free books, and books that help me in my work, even better. Via the Information Literacy Weblog I discovered the Handbook for Information Literacy Teaching (link to the book resource).
  • Not a free book, unless I managed to get it via Interlibrary Loan maybe, but still it could help with my work. There is a new book on librarians and serving diverse populations out. The book is Information Services to Diverse Populations: Developing Culturally Competent Library Professionals by Nicole Cooke, and here is the announcement of the book’s release from her employer.
  • Library Juice Press announces they have a new book on social justice and the LIS classroom. This may be more for LIS college professors than practitioners in the field, but it may be worth a look. The book is Teaching for Social Justice: Implementing Social Justice in the LIS Classroom.
  • Here is a book about libraries, specifically Carnegie Libraries. The book is Free to All: Carnegie Libraries & American Culture, 1890-1920, and it was briefly mentioned at LIS News.
  • I always like books about bar culture, its lore and history, even though I am not much into bars personally (I like the concept, just not the execution and culture these days). This new book is “a sort of compilation of a dozen or more ‘Old Books, with a particular focus on two Waldorf-centric books from the 1930s. In nearly 400 pages, Caiafa takes you through an alphabetical exploration of the classics, providing their recipes, variations, backstories, and in-depth context for every cocktail’s creation.” Features old books? That is just a bonus for me. The book is The Waldorf Astoria Bar Book, and it was reviewed at Drinkhacker.
  • Via 20th Century Man, a  suggestion to read Dean R. Koontz’s Demon Seed novel. I am thinking maybe having a feature on the main book blog where I go back and review older, classics and other not so well remembered books. Stay tuned.
  • Claire Conner, author of Wrapped in the Flag, which is “narrative history of the infamous ultra-conservative John Birch Society, written by one of its founder’s daughters” (from the book’s description), recently had a post in Crooks and Liars entitled “The Radical Right Runs America, But Democrats Still Don’t Get It.” In the post, she highlights the book and discusses how the Democrats and the Left in the U.S. basically do not get it despite all the warnings, signs, evidence, so on. I can certainly point  to a  few books  I have read already in addition to Ms. Conner’s that explain just fine what is going on and how we got to having the Pendejo in Chief in the White House. The bottom line is the warnings and signs were all there to be seen, but many chose not to see while the bigots, misogynists, ultra conservatives dug in and then blew things up. I have not read Conner’s book yet, but I am adding it to my list and hope to get to it soon.
  • I have not added any new, or at least new to me, mangas in a while, so here is Goblin Slayer, Volume 1. It was reviewed at A Case for Suitable Treatment.

 

Lists and bibliographies:

  • With the election  of the Pendejo in Chief as President of the United States and the ascendancy of his party, there are major concerns when it comes to women’s health and rights. One of those concerns is the Roe v. Wade decision that every other “pro-lifer” wants to abolish because women dying in back alleys is a small price to pay to keep those uppity women in place. If you want to learn more about how it was before that judicial decision, here is a list of books on “What Life Was Like Before Roe v. Wade in 7 Books.” Go read a book or two and get a clue as needed. Story via Signature.
  • Also via Signature, another list to help during the Hard Times where lies (oops, alternative facts) seem to be the order of the day. So, to help inoculate you from the bullshit, here is “Myth Busting Books: 13 Antidotes to ‘Alternative Facts‘”.
  • One more from Signature to help with the Hard Times. There has been  a lot about Russia in the news recently, so to help out here is “Spy vs. Spy: 13 Books on the Shadowy Past of Russia-US Relations.
  • Another type of book that some folks may  want to read during the Hard Times ahead are the Latin American novels of the dictator. Book Riot has a list of four of these for your consideration. And yes, there are others we could add to the list. I have read two from the list.
  • Book Riot also has a list of “100 Must-Read Graphic Memoirs.” I do not think every single title is a must-read, but there are some gems in the pile if you have the patience to look.
  • The Information Literacy Weblog has a small list of some free books on social media research overseas with links to the resources.

 

Photo from Flickr user Raider of Gin (fairerdingo). Image used under terms of Creative Commons 2.0 Generic Attribution License.

Photo from Flickr user Raider of Gin (fairerdingo). Image used under terms of Creative Commons 2.0 Generic Attribution License.

This is the last batch of book reviews I did for 2016. If you missed any, click the links below and check them out. As always, if you read any, feel free to comment and let me know your thoughts. Also, suggestions for things you think I may want to read are always welcome. Links below go to my reviews.

 

Photo from Flickr user Raider of Gin (fairerdingo). Image used under terms of Creative Commons 2.0 Generic Attribution License.

Photo from Flickr user Raider of Gin (fairerdingo). Image used under terms of Creative Commons 2.0 Generic Attribution License.

This is my summary with links of books I reviewed at The Itinerant Librarian for the month of November 2016. If you missed any of them, feel free to check them out. As always, comments are welcome.

 

 

CuriousGeorgeReading

I have reached 70 of these lists. Never ceases to amaze me how many interesting books I keep finding that I want to read someday, and if any of my readers find a reading idea in these posts, that is cool too. As some of you may know, I recently started studying Tarot, so that explains why you may find a book or two on Tarot on these lists once in a while. So, let’s see what has made the list this week.

Items about books  I want to read:

  • While I am not sure I would personally get a tattoo (I have speculated on what I  would get if I ever decide to do it), I have mentioned previously that I do find tattoo art fascinating, especially when it  is well done. So naturally, a book on tattoo art can be of interest to me. Via Boing Boing, I found Mitch O’Connell’s new book  of his tattoo art: Mitch O’Connell Tattoos Volume 2.
  • Also via Boing Boing, a chance to look back at a bit of my childhood with  a  book on toys from the 50s, 60s, and 70s. The book is Toys of the ‘50s, ’60s and ’70s.
  • Coloring books are a craze these days with adults, and there  is one for just about any topic under the sun.  For instance, there is a Sex Toy Coloring Book (link to publisher, warning cover is  slightly NSFW). The book was reviewed at Bea’s Book Nook. Sounds like something you and your special someone can share in fun.
  • In Llewellyn’s blog, Barbara Moore writes a bit about the book Psychic Tarot and how to integrate  some of its  advice. The book sounds intriguing to me as I continue my learning journey in Tarot and oracle cards.
  • Also at the Llewellyn blog, Moore also speaks on how some Tarot books specific to one deck can still have information you can use with  other decks. While at it, she mentions the book The Ultimate Guide to Thoth Tarot. Down the road, I would like to learn and study the Thoth Tarot deck.
  • My interest in Tarot and oracle cards continues. At the moment, I just read the cards for myself mainly as a meditation tool. So a book on how to read better for yourself is something I would be interested in. The Tarot Lady interviews Courtney Weber, author of Tarot for One.
  • Meanwhile, Tarot with Jeff has been doing a bit of Tarot history reading with the book A Wicked Pack of Cards.
  • Marion Nestle at Food Politics highlights the book Ten Restaurants that Changed America.
  • Via The Information Literacy Weblog, link to the free information literacy e-book Got a Minute? This is billed as a collection  of essays for busy instruction librarians. It’s the kind of quick refresher I can always use.
  • Dark Horse has a 30th anniversary edition of their Aliens comics. The book is Aliens 30th Anniversary: The Original Comic Series, and it was reviewed at Wink Books.
  • Apparently, Salvador Dali at one point put a cookbook together. Being Dali, it is a surrealist cookbook. Turns out that Taschen is reprinting the book, and I would love to take a look at it. The book is Les Diners de Gala, and I heard about it at the Fine Books & Collections blog.
  • With the election of Donald Trump, some wonder if the signs were there. I can say that yes, they were. If people had paid attention and heeded the lessons of the past, and actually gave a damn about their fellow human beings, the Con Man of Mar-a-Lago would not be headed to the White House; some people have labeled him as Caudillo of Mar-a-Lago, but that is an insult to what caudillo actually means (I am Latino, believe me, I know a thing or two about real caudillos). But let me move past digression. Some folks have  been looking around to see if works anywhere predicted the election. Here is one that could be convincing in that regard. The New York Times highlights the book Achieving Our Country by Richard Rorty. They highlighted three paragraphs from the book that are now all over the Internet, reviving interest in the 1998 book. I am not usually one to pick up books that go viral, but the passages have made me curious enough to be interested because they pretty much reflect other things I have read that confirm what the book’s author wrote. Hat tip to 3 Quarks Daily. The signs were definitely there.
  • I have mentioned before that I find old books interesting. Here is  How to Speak with the Dead from 1918, which you can read for free online thanks to archive.org. Tip via Daily Tarot.
  • And speaking of the dead, here is a book of essays and photos of the dearly departed. The book is Memento Mori, and it was reviewed at Wink Books.
  • Staying a bit more with the odd and curious, here is a book of botanical images that looks interesting. The book is Cabinet of Natural Curiosities, and it was reviewed at Wink Books.
  • Wink Books also recommends B.P.R.D. 1946-1948. I already like Hellboy and the B.P.R.D., so I do not need too much arm twisting to pick that one up.
  • Again, here is another of those illustrated books that show how things work that I just love to look over. The book is Food Anatomy, and it was highlighted at Wink Books.
  • This one may help me get a bit of LGBTQIA reading in, and it is a graphic novel too. The book is Queer: a Graphic History, and it was presented at Lambda Literary.
  • Based on a True Story reviews a new book about marijuana and cannabis. The book is Brave New Weed.
  • Wink Books reviews a cook book by Alton Brown that seems to channel his Good Eats show days (before he went downhill). The book is Alton Brown: EveryDayCook.

 

Lists and bibliographies:

  • Horror Novel Reviews offers a list  of “10 Horror Novels That Deserve a Big Screen Adaptation.” For me, this is also a list of possible reading suggestions.
  • Recent reviews and responses to the book Hillbilly Elegy have been mixed to say the least. If you want to read other things instead of that book or to supplement if you already read it, here is a list of other books you may be interested in. Via The Booklist Reader.
  • I always wish I had to the time to improve on my handwriting ( do write in a pretty good cursive, but there is always room to improve) and even learn calligraphy. In the meantime, I can read a bit about it, so here is a list of books that can help you learn hand lettering and calligraphy. Via BookRiot.

CuriousGeorgeReading

The list of books I wish to read some day keeps growing, but the time to read them does not always grow to match. Still, I do enjoy making these posts so I can keep track of things I find interesting. In sharing them, I hope it helps a bit in terms of reader’s advisory for folks looking for ideas on books to read.

Items about books I want to read:

 

Lists and bibliographies:

 

 

CuriousGeorgeReading

 

Another post and another list of books I would like to read some day. One thing is certain. I will never run out of books to read, and that is a good thing. I also hope my four readers out there find something good to read from these lists once in a while. So, if you pick up a book from any of these posts, please feel free to leave me a comment and let me know. I would love to hear from you.

For anyone who has not read these posts before, this is about me listing books I would like to read. I include the source that gave me the idea about the book, say a review, an article, so on, in order to be able to remind myself why I included the book on the list. In these posts, I also include any lists and bibliographies on topics that may be of interest.

Items about books I want to read:

  • In the United States, and let us be honest, a few other parts of the world, poverty can be big business for the right people doing the exploiting. In the U.S., they raise that to an art form when it comes to taking programs meant to help the poor and those in need and trying to privatize them to make money for exploitative corporations while taking those funds away from those that need them. Via The Atlantic, here is a discussion of the issue and highlight of the book The Poverty Industry.
  • Thomas Frank, author of Listen, Liberal: Or, What Ever Happened to the Party of the People?, talks about what the hell happened to the Democratic Party in the United States. One of the things he argues is that “the problem with establishment Democrats is not that they have been bribed by Goldman Sachs, Morgan Stanley and others, but that long ago they determined to supplant the GOP as the party of Wall Street.” I would say in essence, the Democrats in the U.S. have become “Republican-lite.” Story via Democracy Now!
  • On a bit of humor along with eroticism, apparently at one point hipster erotica was a thing, and Hannah Wilde wrote a few books on it to the point she has a series of The Complete Hipster Gangbangs (link to Amazon on this one. I am sure you understand this will not be in WorldCat anytime soon). The story comes via VICE. Sometimes it amazes me the things I can find out there.
  • Here is a possible addition to my list of books for the 2016 Horror Reading Challenge, which I am doing this year. The book is Blood Related, and it was reviewed at Horror Novel Reviews. Here is a little something from the review: “We have a very rough-around-the-edges family. A serial killer for a father, drunk for a mother, and twin boys who witness more than any child should.”
  • Laugh now, but in some distant future, men could be forced to make love to beautiful women. At least that is how Pagan Passions would put it. You can download the book for free here (it is in public domain). And yes, a few libraries still have it too. The book was featured at the WTF Bad Science Fiction Covers blog. It is a pity the blog went on hiatus. It was an amusing blog.
  • Tarot with Jeff recently got a book as a birthday gift from a friend. I need to find more friends like he has. My friends do not get me jack and shit for my birthday. Anyhow, the book he received was Benebell Wen’s Holistic Tarot, and it looks like a good book for me to read to help along in my Tarot learning journey.
  • Speaking of Tarot, when I started my journey to learn how to read Tarot cards, I started it with a Marseilles Tarot deck. While I do like the deck for being a classic and bringing me some pleasant memories of youth, I could not do much reading with it because the Minor Arcana is not illustrated. I was just not able to develop my intuition enough, and I had to keep constantly turning to the book. So, I switched the deck I use now, the Gilded Tarot by Ciro Marchetti, which is a modern, more visual deck. However, I do intend to go back to using my Marseilles once I feel I have learned the basic meanings well enough to need less visual prompts. Unlike the Rider Waite Smith Tarot system, there are not many books to help you learn the Marseilles deck. Well, lucky for me, The Moon Parlor mentions a book just for that: Marseille Tarot: Towards The Art of Reading. The other big author in learning Marseilles Tarot in modern times is Alejandro Jodorowsky, who is also mentioned in the post. His book is The Way of Tarot, a book that I have seen mentioned in a few other places, and I am likely to add to my collection. When it comes to learning Marseilles Tarot, I need all the help I can get.
  • Via Death and Tarot, a video highlighting the book 78 Degrees of Wisdom by Rachel Pollack. From what I  understand, this is considered a classic in Tarot studies.
  • Via Benebell Wen’s blog, a review of Foundations of the Esoteric Traditions. The book is a companion to the Tarot of the Holy Light Tarot deck. As it is self-published, just visit her post for links and details.
  • At the Eternal Athena Tarot blog they’ve been reading the book Tarot as a Way of Life.
  • Moving to other topics, Dick Gregory recently wrote an essay for college students about knowing when to pick your battles and what really matters in activism. He also mentions his autobiography, which he entitled Nigger, which the essay has inspired me to add to my reading list.
  • I find old paperbacks and their covers fascinating, including the so-called sleazy ones. Well, there is a book out on those covers highlighted at Bookgasm. The book is Sin-a-Rama: Sleaze Sex Paperbacks of the Sixties edited by B. Astrid Daley and Adam Parfrey. The book is also highlighted in this article from Dangerous Minds.
  • Like tacos? Want to learn more about tacos? Then maybe the book Tacopedia could help. It was featured at Wink Books.
  • The Library Juice blog points to a new journal in library science, the Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy. Sounds like one to add to my reading list. Their first issue has a review of one of Library Juice’s books, which is of interest to me. The book is Where are all the Librarians of Color? The Experiences of People of Color in Academia.
  • The Rural Blog has a post on “Book about extended Appalachian family helps explain trials of the lesser-educated working class.” The book is Hillbilly Elegy.
  • Via Democracy Now!, a discussion on how Donald Trump made his fortune with public subsidies and political favors with a reporter who has tracked and covered Trump since Trump early days. That reported is author of a Trump biography: Trump: The Greatest Show on Earth: The Deals, the Downfall, the Reinvention. The book was published in 1991, but it has recently been released again as an e-book with some updates. For those wanting to learn more about the man, this book is a possibility, and in the report, the author provides various updates.

 

Lists and bibliographies:


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