Alchemical Thoughts

Posts Tagged ‘books and reading

This is the lucky 7’s edition of this blog series. Let’s have a look at what I am adding to the ever growing TBR list this time. As usual, all book title links lead to WorldCat so you can find a copy in a library near you (unless otherwise noted).

Items about books I want to read:

  • One of the reasons I like early October is because it  is Nobel Prizes season. One of the prizes announced was the one in economics. This year, it went to an economist who works in behavioral economics. I do not usually read economics texts, but this kind of work sounds interesting, so I am adding his book Nudge to my reading list.
  • Marion Nestle mentions providing a blurb for the book Big Chicken.
  • Since reading Smoke Gets In Your Eyes, a book I highly recommend by the way(link to my review), I have become more interested in learning about death rituals and the death/mortuary industry. Here is another addition for reading in those topics. The book is Confessions of a Funeral Director. The book’s author was interviewed in VICE.
  • Another one via VICE. The book in question discusses the freelance and wandering worker economy. Imagine a world where workers just wander from one big warehouse, like Amazon’s fulfillment warehouses, to another to make ends meet. For many, that dystopia is already a reality. The book is Nomadland.
  • I have to admit that though I like and enjoy science fiction, I have not read as much of it recently as I would like. There is always  something else calling my attention, or perhaps a nonfiction book that feels more urgent than something escapist. Still, I want to work on having a better reading balance. Here is a book that bills itself as a “definitive anthology of space opera and military sf.” That is a tall order, so I am curious. The book is Infinite Stars, and it was reviewed at Bookgasm.
  • There is a new manga rebooting Captain Harlock. Of course I have to add it to my reading list. The book is Captain Harlock, Space Pirate: Dimensional Voyage, Volume 1. It was reviewed at A Case for Suitable Treatment.
  • For something different, Dangerous Minds looks a bit at the work of Bruce of Los Angeles with the male figure and mentions the book The Naked Heartland.
  • Via Patheos, a look at “Paula Deen and Charlottesville.” The article mentions and features an excerpt from the book Trouble I’ve Seen.
  • A librarian has a new book out about J.C. Penney, the guy who founded the company and had a bit of a role in shaping rural United States. The book is J.C. Penney: The Man, the Store, and American Agriculture, and I heard about it from the University of Wyoming’s site.
  • Something for my horror reading, a review of Paul F. Olson’s short fiction collection Whispered Echoes. Review via Horror Novel Reviews.
  • The poor, “oppressed,” left behind poor rural white guy Pendejo In Chief voter has pretty much become a cliche. Break out the little violins for those assholes. Books like Hillbilly Elegy came out to try to “explain” those people to the  rest of us with  little success (let’s be honest, that author basically is a guy of privilege who clearly forgot where he came from to put it mildly). So by now, when I see yet another book on Appalachia and the poor, I groan. Still, here is the latest offering that claims to be “not just another account of Appalachia’s current plight, but a journey deeper in time to help us understand how the region came to be the way it is.” I will believe it when I see it and read it. I am adding it to the list not so much because I want to read it; I may or may not, but because it does have a local interest to me. Odds are good my college library will order a copy of it. The book is Ramp Hollow: The Ordeal of Appalachia, and it was discussed in ProPublica.
  • A new book connects the old Ku Klux Klan with the rise of bigoted hate that seems so rampant today. If you read your history, you would not be surprised. At any rate, if you want to learn more, maybe consider reading The Second Coming of the KKK. Reviewed at The Texas Observer.
  • A little something in critical theory and information sciences. Library Juice blog announces a new book: The Feminist Reference Desk.

 

 

Lists and bibliographies:

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Photo from Flickr user Raider of Gin (fairerdingo). Image used under terms of Creative Commons 2.0 Generic Attribution License.

 

This is the list of books I reviewed at The Itinerant Librarian for September 2017. If you missed any, or you find any of interest, feel free to check them out. Comments are always  welcome.

 

Photo from Flickr user Raider of Gin (fairerdingo). Image used under terms of Creative Commons 2.0 Generic Attribution License.

This is the list with links for books I reviewed at The Itinerant Librarian during the month of August 2017. If you missed any or are curious, feel free to check them out.

 

Made it to 76 of these to be read lists. Let’s see what we are adding this time.

 

Items about books I want to read:

  • This book may answer a question I am sure many people in the U.S. have: why the heck do government prosecutors not prosecute rich executives and CEOs when they commit financial crimes, etc. The book is The Chickenshit Club. The book was reviewed at The New York Times.
  • In a case of what is old is new again, Hannah Arendt’s 1951 book The Origins of Totalitarianism is popular again. Story via Vox.
  • Once more, I wonder where are these thrift stores where people find cool stuff like vintage horror novels. Anyhow, if I can find it, I may consider reading The Beast Within. It was reviewed at Horror Novel Reviews.
  • The story of the book saviors/smugglers of Timbuktu, which was seen in The Bad-Ass Librarians of Timbuktu, is getting yet another book treatment with The Book Smugglers of Timbuktu. The latter book was reviewed at The Guardian. I am always a little leery when I see books on the same topic come out real close in publication to each other. A few librarians I know have mentioned the first book, so I am bit more likely to pick that one. We’ll see.
  • A new book argues that Hitler exploited an interest in his audience in the supernatural and the occult. The book is Hitler’s Monsters, and the author was interviewed in VICE.
  • In the U.S., you can go pretty much to any  good grocery  store and find any fruit or vegetable any time of the year no matter the season. That may be a big issue, and it is explored in the book Never Out of Season. The book was reviewed in The New York Times.
  • You know things are bad in the United States  when some parents wonder how they can talk to their kids about the Pendejo In Chief. Well, for those few folks with values and concerns, there is a new book that deals with  how to talk to children about Trump. The book is How Do I Explain This to my Kids? Parenting in the Age of Trump. Book was mentioned at BillMoyers.com.
  • Here is a memoir of a very unlikely true story: a young “campaign manager” to get his friend to be Playgirl’s Man of the Year back in the seventies. Story via Boing Boing. The book is Man of the Year by Lou Cove.
  • I have liked Arturo Pérez Reverte after I read El Club Dumas. I probably should reread it sometime so I can write a proper review. Anyhow, another of his novels recently got a mention and review at Sounds and Colours. The book is La Reina del Sur. On a side note, I might be able to get to that book sooner as I recently found a copy in our local public library’s Friends of the Library sale.
  • This next book I am adding out of curiosity, though I am not sure if I will feel up to reading it or not given its topic of dysfunctions of academia. I already see things this book may cover on a semi-regular basis. so I do not feel a need to read about them, but as I said, I am curious. If nothing else, the book gives me hope that perhaps some day I ought to write the book I have  in mind about academic libraries and their dysfunctions. Yes, I have a tale or two I could tell in fictional form. Anyhow, the book in question now is Dealing with Dysfunction: a Book for University Leaders. It was reviewed at Inside Higher Ed.
  • Apparently higher education workplace toxicity is possibly an emerging trend in books as here is another one also featured at Inside Higher Ed. The book is The Toxic University. Again, I am adding it not so much because I am sure to read it but mostly out of curiosity.
  • Based on a True Story reviews the book Al Franken: Giant of the Senate. I am not keen on yet another politician’s book, but Franken may well be the only decent US Senator serving today. Heck, I’d consider moving to Minnesota just so I could vote for him and keep him in office. The review states that Franken reads the audiobook himself, so I may consider reading it in audio form too.
  • An American tries to understand how the United States relates to the rest of the world in Notes on a Foreign Country. It was reviewed in The Christian Science Monitor.
  • Interested in LGBT movie poster history? Then The Queer Movie Poster Book may be for you. It was mentioned in this article on The Advocate.
  • The Texas Observer recently had an article on the devotion of Santa Muerte. Aside from the article being interesting to read, it mentions some books I may want to read or at least look over down the road.
  • Via The Spectator, review of a book on Arabic script and calligraphy. The book is By the Pen and What They Write.
  • For librarians, and those who just like libraries, yes, there is a book on card catalogs, and The Washington Post reviewed it. The book is The Card Catalog.
  • Via The Texas Observer, the author of Los Zetas Inc., discusses why Mexico’s drug war is not about drugs.
  • Here is a little more shop reading for the librarian. Library Juice Press is announcing a new book: Topographies of Whiteness: Mapping Whiteness in Library and Information Science. It sounds like a relevant book for these Hard Times.
  • Finally for this post, a little children’s book that I think adults who like comics will enjoy as well. The book is Bedtime for Batman, and it was presented at Wink Books.

 

Lists and bibliographies:

 

Photo from Flickr user Raider of Gin (fairerdingo). Image used under terms of Creative Commons 2.0 Generic Attribution License.

This is the list of books I reviewed at The Itinerant Librarian during the month of July 2017. If you missed any, or you are just looking for something new to read, check them out.

 

Here is the list of books I reviewed over at The Itinerant Librarian for June 2017. Feel free to check them out. Book links go to the reviews unless noted otherwise.

Photo from Flickr user Raider of Gin (fairerdingo). Image used under terms of Creative Commons 2.0 Generic Attribution License.

 

 

This is the list of books I reviewed over at The Itinerant Librarian for the month of May 2017. Book links go to the my review unless otherwise noted. Feel to check them out.

Photo from Flickr user Raider of Gin (fairerdingo). Image used under terms of Creative Commons 2.0 Generic Attribution License.

 


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