Alchemical Thoughts

5 Books That Represent Me

Posted on: April 1, 2016

I saw this prompt over at Based on a True Story, and I decided to try it out. Picking out five books was not easy for me, and though I picked out five for this post, if you ask me again a few months or years from now, the choices might change.

  • Cien años de soledad (title in English: One Hundred Years of Solitude).  You can find various editions in WorldCat in Spanish and other languages. This is the Argos Vergara Libros DB edition that I have that my mother passed on to me telling me that I had to read it, and so I did. This novel is my all time favorite book, and it is one I tell everyone they need to read if they wish to understand a bit of the Latin American experience, especially as it relates to the United States. But the novel itself is so much more. My copy is now tattered, falling apart, and while I could replace it with a nicer edition, say the Real Academia’s academic edition, well, it was my mother’s copy, and it is one of the very few things I have of hers, and in time I may pass it on to my daughter.
  • James Alan Gardner’s novel Expendable. From the book description, “On any given planetdown mission, there’s always someone whose job it is to walk into danger and get killed. What must it be like to be him, knowing your lifespan is as short as a fruitfly’s?” The main character, Festina Ramos, an expendable member of the Explorer Corps is quite admirable and tenacious, which inspires me. In many ways, I feel like a member of an explorer corps. Plus, unlike certain so-called “rock star” librarians, I have no illusions about being expendable.
  • El Alquimista (title in English: The Alchemist). You can also find various editions of this in English and other languages in WorldCat. Paulo Coelho is Brazilian and writes in Portuguese. Personally, I prefer to read his works in Spanish translation, as that feels much closer to his original language than English. I first read this book when I was about to embark on a new adventure. I had just finished library school, on the basis of a little faith (faith in my myself and the faith of others who believed I could do it), and I was seeking my first professional librarian position. Much like the boy in the story, I was in search of my dream, and I had faith the world would come together to make it happen. I have been a librarian for over a decade now, and it has been a great joy to be a librarian.
  • Las Venas Abiertas de América Latina (English title: The Open Veins of Latin America). You can find various editions in WorldCat. One of the few books I read in college early on that was actually worth a damn. For me, one I would recommend people to who wish to understand the Latin American experience, thus help understand me a bit as well since I was shaped by a big part of that experience. In college, for me, reading and discussing this in a class on Hispanic Culture, Language, and Identity was truly eye opening, and I wish I could tell that teacher thank you for the experience, an experience that shapes me even today.
    • Tied with Galeano’s book is a recent reading, War Against All Puerto Ricans (link to my review). This is a must read to understand the Puerto Rican experience, especially as it relates to the exploitative colonial relation it has to the United States. This is the history my parents and their parents lived, and that I still lived and was influenced by.
  • The Ciaphas Cain novels (Warhammer 40,000. The first three have been collected in an omnibus edition, which I own). From the book’s description, “In the 41st Millennium, Commissar Ciaphas Cain is looking for an easy life, but fate has a habit of throwing him into the deadliest situations and luck always manages to pull him through.” I have a bit of Ciaphas Cain, looking for the easy life, but that is not always an option. Sometimes fate just has other plans for you, and you have to move onward and make things work out. Now, Cain is no coward. He is actually a very skilled fighter and swordsman; he just prefers the easy life. I’d rather have things easy at times, but hey, I’ve got to work for a living.
    • Tied with the Ciaphas Cain novels are the novels of Captain Uriel Ventris and the Ultramarines (Warhammer 40,000. The first six novels of the series are collected in an omnibus and a second omnibus, which I own). Captain Ventris of the 6th Company, like his Ultramarines brothers in arms, lives by the rules. Of the Emperor’s Space Marines, the Ultramarines take the idea of “by the book” to the extreme. So when Ventris bends the rules and succeeds in battle, what do his brethren do? Why they send him to exile to some hell hole to “redeem” himself in their eyes. Because apparently he did not kick enough ass and do it by the rules. Ventris is a guy with integrity who is also practical, honorable, and perseverant, which is why I like him so.

 

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2 Responses to "5 Books That Represent Me"

This is a great list. I’m going to look for Expendible and The Open Veins of Latin America.

Heather.

Thanks for stopping by. I provided WorldCat links above, so you can see if a local public library nearby has either one. Good luck, and feel free to stop back and comment if you do read them.

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