Alchemical Thoughts

Items about books I want to read, #53

Posted on: July 17, 2015

Rolling right along in adding books to the ever growing TBR list. Let’s see what we got this week:

CuriousGeorgeReading

Items about books I want to read:

  • This book is probably not one for vegetarians and vegans. The book is In Meat We Trust: an Unexpected History of Carnivore America, and it was featured in San Francisco Book Review. Apparently, according to the book, meat helped make America. I will have to read and see.
  • Staying with the food theme, this one was also featured in San Francisco Book Review. Now this one is more about food choices and sustainability. The book is Food Choice and Sustainability: Why Buying Local, Eating Less Meat, and Taking Baby Steps Won’t Work. This is probably not one for the carnivores who may be reading the previous book, though probably eating a little less meat may be a good thing. I am not quite ready to just stop eating all meat.
  • Let’s look at lack of food now. Marion Nestle has written a foreword to an updated edition of the book Breadlines Knee-Deep in Wheat: Food Assistance in the Great Depression.
  • And now let’s go for a little dessert with Bourbon Desserts. The reviewer at Drinkhacker claims that “novices, experts, and destructive cooks alike can approach this book with confidence knowing that in the end, bourbon makes everything taste better.”
  • The great actor Christopher Lee passed away this year. He did some of his fine horror work for Hammer Films, but did you know Hammer Films made more than just horror films? Apparently, they also did a series of psychological thriller and suspense films too. You can learn about them in the book Hammer Films’ Psychological Thrillers 1950-1972. The book was reviewed in Bookgasm.
  • Also reviewed at Bookgasm, a new collection of short stories by Ed Gorman. I admit, I am not terribly familiar with that author, so there is a possible reason to add the book to my list. “The 14 tales range from straight-up crime to peeks into a bizarre future. ” The book is Scream Queen and Other Tales of Menace.
  • A couple of books in LIS and related to my work as instruction librarian. Both of these reviews come via The Journal of Librarianship and Information Science (the review links lead to PDF pages from the journal).
  • A new to me manga that does look like it may not be easy to get. That is often the case with manga in the U.S.; good stuff may come over, barely gets published, goes out of print before anyone notices let alone the publisher gives it a decent chance, and vanishes. Anyhow, the title this time is Maka-Maka: Sex, Life, and Communication, Vol. 1. There may or not be a volume 2 out (WorldCat found a French edition of the second one), and that may be about it. It was reviewed at Experiments in Manga.
  • This seems to be a case where the movie may be better than the book or vice versa, depending on where your preferences lie. The book is Ring, from which the movie was adapted. The book is translated from Japanese. It was reviewed in Contemporary Japanese Literature. On a side note, my library, Hutchins Library at Berea College, has a copy, so I may get to it sooner.
  • To this day, and likely for some years to come, we are recuperating from the 2008 economic collapse. Matt Taibbi offers a look at those times in his recent book The Divide: American Injustice in the Age of the Wealth Gap. The book was reviewed at Blogcritics.
  • Via Wink Books, this looks very nice. The book set is Dian Hanson’s History of Pin-Up Magazines. It is one of those nice editions Taschen puts out.
  • On a more serious note, a new book on invisible work, that is important work that is often done behind the scenes, say like U.N. translators. The book is Invisibles: The Power of Anonymous Work in an Age of Relentless Self-Promotion. In some ways, the work of many librarians could well qualify as invisible work by this metric, say catalogers (let’s be honest. If a good cataloger does his or her work well, you never hear of the person, you only see the great work in the catalog they create for us) for example or just good librarians who do  the good work daily without blowing their horns every ten minutes it would seem. You know the ones. Anyhow, the book was reviewed by Joshua Kim in Inside Higher Ed.
  • I am not sure if this book will answer the old joke, but it certainly sounds interesting. The book is Why Did the Chicken Cross the Road? The Epic Saga of the Bird That Powers Civilization. By the way, have you noticed how often these microhistories are all “sagas” and often they are “epic sagas” of however the subject saved or powered civilization? Anyhow, the book was featured at Blogging for a Good Book.
  • Every other librarian seems to be talking about this book, which usually means either the book is a big deal, or it is not that much a deal and folks are just getting on another passing fad. At any rate, I am adding it to my list so I can keep it on my radar, but I am not sure if I will read it right away or not, and books like this tend to need reading right as they come out. This seems another one of those “yea, libraries are great, and they will survive even with Google around” books. I am not sure I need yet another book to tell me that. Although, it seems a lot of librarians do need a book to tell them just that; our profession is amazingly insecure, go figure. So, maybe by the time I get to it, the fad will pass unless it does have a message meant to remain. We shall see. The book is BiblioTech, and it is being reviewed at PhiloBiblos.

 

Lists and bibliographies:

  • If pegging is among your fetishes, then this list may be of interest for erotica readers who enjoy it. While it is not a big topic of interest for me, I have read a tale or two in the genre I have found to be OK at least. As I have said before, I am always willing to read new things. The list is “Peg This: Six Erotic Pegging Stories You Must Read.” It was published at RT Book Reviews.
  • Do you like stories set in dirigibles and air ships? Bookshelves of Doom has “Airships Ahoy! Thirteen Stories Set on Dirigibles.
  • Like milk? Shelf Talk has “Got Milk?” highlighting two books on the history and uses of milk.

 

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