Alchemical Thoughts

Items about books I want to read, #52

Posted on: June 19, 2015

Here we go again with another list of books I would like to read. I should note that I do get to read one or two from these lists once in a while. A post making such a list may be in order just for reassurance. In the meantime, here are a few more books I would like to read.

 

CuriousGeorgeReading

Items about books:

  • Infrastructure in the United States, especially transportation, is basically a clusterfuck of neglect. As much as people like to whine about the bad roads or getting stuck in airports, it’s not like they get their butts up to vote for politicians who may make moves to fix it. Nor are politicians in any rush to fix the crumbling mess even as bridges fall left and right. In a new book, the author seeks some answers. The book is Move: Putting America’s Infrastructure Back in the Lead, and it was featured in HBS Working Knowledge blog.
  • I recently read Smoke Gets In Your Eyes, a memoir of a crematorium worker that also gives an inside look at the mortuary industry. It has sparked an interest for me in the topic. One of the things I learned in that book is that embalming is really bad for a variety of environmental issues. So, when I saw this article on AlterNet about embalming and seeking out other more green burial options, it caught my eye. The article highlights the book Grave Matters by Mark Harris. The book is older (2008) than the memoir, so I will be interested to compare.
  • I am sure many folks watch dog shows, probably the Westminster Kennel one that USA Network broadcasts every year. What not many think about are some of the extremes going on in breeding those dogs. In fact, many high end dog breeds are bred and created in ways that basically are detrimental to the canine’s health all for the sake of aesthetics. This article from In These Times says that “We’re Breeding Dogs to Death.” The article is worth a look, and it may even move you to go adopt a nice mutt from a shelter instead of doling out thousands of dollars on some fancy breed dog. The article also mentions the book A Matter of Breeding by Michael Brandow.
  • The police incident (to put it charitably) in McKinney, Texas has been all over the news as I type this. In the end, racism in public pools is not really new. In fact, a big element of white flight is for those folks to be able to set up their own private club pools to keep “the undesirables” out. This article in The Atlantic discusses the incident, talks about that history, and it highlights a book I want to add to my reading list. The book is Contested Waters: a Social History of Swimming Pools in America. Actually, as a side note, WorldCat reveals my library, Hutchins Library at Berea College, has it, so I may be able to read this one a bit sooner. If I do, my four readers can expect a review.
  • And now a little erotica. As the reviewer in San Francisco Book Review writes, “a happy marriage is an underappreciated, often overlooked thing.” When I look around, you have to be selective to find good erotica that deals with happy marriages where the focus is on the couple itself. The book Bedded Bliss sounds interesting in that it combines some self-help and advice for married couples to keep the fires alive combined with some erotica.
  • Another erotica selection. Alison Tyler is an erotic editor who, like Rachel Kramer Bussel,  does not steer me wrong. So I usually seek out her works. Also via San Francisco Book Review, the book is Down and Dirty: 69 Super Sexy Short-Shorts. I have enjoyed other books of erotic short-shorts, such as The Big Book of Orgasms, so I am hoping Tyler’s anthology will be similar in appeal factors and overall just good reading.
  • And speaking of Rachel Kramer Bussel, she has an erotica anthology with a theme of encounters in hotel rooms. I have no idea if any of the stories involve librarians hooking up at conferences (which was a big fuss in thread in that librarian forum I try to avoid). I will go on the limb and admit that is a small fantasy of mine, but for now, it will stay in the fantasy realm (unless some day I decide to try my hand out at writing it into a story). Anyhow, in the meantime, I will settle for reading the book Do Not Disturb, which was reviewed in BDSM Book Reviews.
  • On a bit of a different kink track, BDSM Book Reviews also reviewed Safe Word a while back. This is a sequel to Carrie’s Story, and as I read in the review, the novels are reminiscent of classic erotic tale The Story of O. I will certainly pick up the first novel before the second, and when I do, I will review them.
  • If you are a fan of femdom in your erotica, then Her Wish is Your Command by D.L. King may be for you. The book was reviewed at BDSM Book Reviews. (No WorldCat record found as of this post. The review has Amazon link if so inclined. Probably due to it being an e-book).
  • Moving along, let’s have some booze. I certainly do like a woman who can have a good drink with me. I also enjoy books about the history of alcoholic spirits, so here is a book about how women helped save spirits like bourbon and whiskey. The book is Whiskey Women, and it was reviewed at Drinkhacker.
  • One of my reading challenges for 2015 is to read more horror fiction, so this may fit the bill. The book, which according to the review has been marketed as a “psycho thriller,” is In the Miso Soup. And by the way, checking WorldCat tells me this is another one we have, so I may be able to read it sooner.
  • It may have been started as utopian endeavor in the late 19th century and went on to become an artist commune, but the Chelsea Hotel in New York City has clearly seen better days, assuming it ever had better days, which seems debatable. At any rate, there is new book telling the history of that city’s landmark. The book is Inside the Dream Palace, and it was reviewed in The Guardian.
  • I do not read as much in the alternate history genre as I used to. And to be honest, when I hear of yet another alternate history where the South wins the U.S. Civil War, I just yawn. But this graphic novel featuring just such a scenario caught my eye because it seems a bit better thought out than most items produced in the South wins scenario. The book is CSA: Southern Cross, Annuit Coeptis, and it was reviewed in BlogCritics. It is volume 1, so I may take a chance, then decide if I want to read the rest.
  • The Wilde Passions of Dorian Gray that promises to show us his real escapades, you know, the ones you do not get in the original classic. This book has been in and out of my radar for a while, but seeing as it is written by Mitzi Szereto, an author I have enjoyed before, and I have seen the book reviewed in a couple of places, it may be time to add it to my list. The book was reviewed by BlogCritics here, and by San Francisco City Book Review over here.
  • As I may have mentioned before, I always find books about books and reading to be a big interest of mine. This one may be a bit esoteric, but it still sounds interesting. The book is The Book Collecting Practices of Black Magazine Editors, and it was published by Litwin Books. The book “focuses on the collecting habits and personal libraries of three black magazine editors.”
  • While we are at it, here are some more LIS and/or reference books from Library Juice Press and Litwin Books that I find of interest.

 

Lists and bibliographies:

  • A while back, Bending the Bookshelf had a guest post with highlights of erotic genre fiction selections from Storm Moon Press.
  • Something that may be useful down the road. The Bisexual Books blog has put together a “Master Review List” for books they have reviewed, and they even arrange it by books they liked and recommend and books you probably should avoid. Very thoughtful of them if you ask me. The list also identifies books by things like genre, how they fall in the LGBTQI spectrum, age range, and other themes.
  • This is a work-related item. Bobbi Newman, of Librarian By Day, has put together a “Reading List–Patron Privacy in the Digital Age.” It includes articles and books. As an update, she is now adding and curating stuff on a Tumblr here.
  • A little PSA for readers. Free Technology for Teachers highlights the website Forgotten Books, where you can find a variety of e-books, mainly public domain stuff, free online.
  • If you are like me and trying to diversify your reading a bit, the folks at Book Riot have put together a very nice “African Reading List.” Organized by nations, it has more than the usual writers you hear about like Chinua Achebe (yet, he is still listed).
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